Association between physical activity, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and prostate volume

Jay Fowke, Sharon Phillips, Tatsuki Koyama, Susan Byerly, Raoul Concepcion, Saundra S. Motley, Peter E. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the association between lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) severity and physical activity (PA) across workplace, home, and leisure domains. To determine the mediating role of prostate enlargement on LUTS severity and PA. Patients and Methods: The study included 405 men without prostate cancer or prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. LUTS severity was ascertained using the American Urological Association Symptom Index and prostate size by ultrasonography. PA was assessed using validated questionnaires, with conversion to metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-h/week to estimate leisure-time PA energy expenditure. Analysis used multivariable linear regression, controlling for body mass index (BMI), age, race, and treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Results: Higher leisure-time PA energy expenditure and light housework activities were significantly associated with lower LUTS severity. Prostate volume was not significantly associated with PA in adjusted analyses, and controlling for prostate volume did not affect the association between LUTS severity and PA. Stratification by BMI showed a moderate interaction (P = 0.052), suggesting that PA was more strongly associated with LUTS severity among obese men. Conclusions: In this cross-sectional analysis, leisure-time and home-time PA was inversely associated with LUTS severity. The association between PA and LUTS severity was stronger for irritative symptoms and among obese men, and was not mediated through changes in prostate size. Our results indicate the need for further detailed investigation of PA and LUTS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-128
Number of pages7
JournalBJU International
Volume111
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Prostate
Exercise
Leisure Activities
Energy Metabolism
Body Mass Index
Metabolic Equivalent
Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia
Housekeeping
Prostatic Hyperplasia
Workplace
Linear Models
Ultrasonography
Prostatic Neoplasms
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cross-Sectional Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Fowke, J., Phillips, S., Koyama, T., Byerly, S., Concepcion, R., Motley, S. S., & Clark, P. E. (2013). Association between physical activity, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and prostate volume. BJU International, 111(1), 122-128. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2012.11287.x

Association between physical activity, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and prostate volume. / Fowke, Jay; Phillips, Sharon; Koyama, Tatsuki; Byerly, Susan; Concepcion, Raoul; Motley, Saundra S.; Clark, Peter E.

In: BJU International, Vol. 111, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 122-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fowke, J, Phillips, S, Koyama, T, Byerly, S, Concepcion, R, Motley, SS & Clark, PE 2013, 'Association between physical activity, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and prostate volume', BJU International, vol. 111, no. 1, pp. 122-128. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2012.11287.x
Fowke, Jay ; Phillips, Sharon ; Koyama, Tatsuki ; Byerly, Susan ; Concepcion, Raoul ; Motley, Saundra S. ; Clark, Peter E. / Association between physical activity, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and prostate volume. In: BJU International. 2013 ; Vol. 111, No. 1. pp. 122-128.
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