Association between vitamin B12-containing supplement consumption and prevalence of biochemically defined B12 deficiency in adults in NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey)

Marian L. Evatt, Paul Terry, Thomas R. Ziegler, Godfrey P. Oakley

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Abstract

Objective: To explore the association between vitamin B12 (B12)-containing supplement use, low B1212 concentrations and biochemically defined B12 deficiency in US adults.Design A cross-sectional study with adjustment for survey design. Prevalence ratios for two age groups (18-50 and >50 years) were estimated using unconditional logistic models. Outcome measures included prevalence of low serum B 12concentration (<148 pmol/l) and biochemical B12 deficiency (serum B12 < 148 pmol/l with concomitant homocysteine > 10 μmol/l).Setting A population survey of health and nutritional measures.Subjects Subjects were non-institutionalized adults, aged 18 years and older, who participated in Phase 2 of NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey).Results: Low B12 concentrations were less prevalent among persons consuming B12-containing supplements (P = 0.001) with an adjusted prevaleratio of 06 (95% CI 0.3, 1.0). Biochemical B 12 deficiency showed a similar trend (P = 0.0002), with an adjusted prevalence ratio of 0.3 (95 % CI 0.1, 0.8). Prevalence ratios were similar in adults >50 years of age, although the prevalence of low B12 and biochemical deficiency was proportionally higher.Conclusions: Consumption of B12-containing supplements was associated with at least 50% lower prevalence of both low serum B12 and biochemical B12 deficiency in a nationally representative sample of US adults, suggesting increased consumption of B12 from supplements or from fortified foods may reduce the prevalence of B12 deficiency. Additionally, the current Recommended Daily Allowance for B12 of 2.4 μg may be insufficient for those aged >50 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-31
Number of pages7
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Nutrition Surveys
Vitamin B 12
Fortified Food
Recommended Dietary Allowances
Health Surveys
Serum
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{a47b07ec519b4354a13f937b548bddb5,
title = "Association between vitamin B12-containing supplement consumption and prevalence of biochemically defined B12 deficiency in adults in NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey)",
abstract = "Objective: To explore the association between vitamin B12 (B12)-containing supplement use, low B1212 concentrations and biochemically defined B12 deficiency in US adults.Design A cross-sectional study with adjustment for survey design. Prevalence ratios for two age groups (18-50 and >50 years) were estimated using unconditional logistic models. Outcome measures included prevalence of low serum B 12concentration (<148 pmol/l) and biochemical B12 deficiency (serum B12 < 148 pmol/l with concomitant homocysteine > 10 μmol/l).Setting A population survey of health and nutritional measures.Subjects Subjects were non-institutionalized adults, aged 18 years and older, who participated in Phase 2 of NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey).Results: Low B12 concentrations were less prevalent among persons consuming B12-containing supplements (P = 0.001) with an adjusted prevaleratio of 06 (95{\%} CI 0.3, 1.0). Biochemical B 12 deficiency showed a similar trend (P = 0.0002), with an adjusted prevalence ratio of 0.3 (95 {\%} CI 0.1, 0.8). Prevalence ratios were similar in adults >50 years of age, although the prevalence of low B12 and biochemical deficiency was proportionally higher.Conclusions: Consumption of B12-containing supplements was associated with at least 50{\%} lower prevalence of both low serum B12 and biochemical B12 deficiency in a nationally representative sample of US adults, suggesting increased consumption of B12 from supplements or from fortified foods may reduce the prevalence of B12 deficiency. Additionally, the current Recommended Daily Allowance for B12 of 2.4 μg may be insufficient for those aged >50 years.",
author = "Evatt, {Marian L.} and Paul Terry and Ziegler, {Thomas R.} and Oakley, {Godfrey P.}",
year = "2010",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Association between vitamin B12-containing supplement consumption and prevalence of biochemically defined B12 deficiency in adults in NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey)

AU - Evatt, Marian L.

AU - Terry, Paul

AU - Ziegler, Thomas R.

AU - Oakley, Godfrey P.

PY - 2010/1/1

Y1 - 2010/1/1

N2 - Objective: To explore the association between vitamin B12 (B12)-containing supplement use, low B1212 concentrations and biochemically defined B12 deficiency in US adults.Design A cross-sectional study with adjustment for survey design. Prevalence ratios for two age groups (18-50 and >50 years) were estimated using unconditional logistic models. Outcome measures included prevalence of low serum B 12concentration (<148 pmol/l) and biochemical B12 deficiency (serum B12 < 148 pmol/l with concomitant homocysteine > 10 μmol/l).Setting A population survey of health and nutritional measures.Subjects Subjects were non-institutionalized adults, aged 18 years and older, who participated in Phase 2 of NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey).Results: Low B12 concentrations were less prevalent among persons consuming B12-containing supplements (P = 0.001) with an adjusted prevaleratio of 06 (95% CI 0.3, 1.0). Biochemical B 12 deficiency showed a similar trend (P = 0.0002), with an adjusted prevalence ratio of 0.3 (95 % CI 0.1, 0.8). Prevalence ratios were similar in adults >50 years of age, although the prevalence of low B12 and biochemical deficiency was proportionally higher.Conclusions: Consumption of B12-containing supplements was associated with at least 50% lower prevalence of both low serum B12 and biochemical B12 deficiency in a nationally representative sample of US adults, suggesting increased consumption of B12 from supplements or from fortified foods may reduce the prevalence of B12 deficiency. Additionally, the current Recommended Daily Allowance for B12 of 2.4 μg may be insufficient for those aged >50 years.

AB - Objective: To explore the association between vitamin B12 (B12)-containing supplement use, low B1212 concentrations and biochemically defined B12 deficiency in US adults.Design A cross-sectional study with adjustment for survey design. Prevalence ratios for two age groups (18-50 and >50 years) were estimated using unconditional logistic models. Outcome measures included prevalence of low serum B 12concentration (<148 pmol/l) and biochemical B12 deficiency (serum B12 < 148 pmol/l with concomitant homocysteine > 10 μmol/l).Setting A population survey of health and nutritional measures.Subjects Subjects were non-institutionalized adults, aged 18 years and older, who participated in Phase 2 of NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey).Results: Low B12 concentrations were less prevalent among persons consuming B12-containing supplements (P = 0.001) with an adjusted prevaleratio of 06 (95% CI 0.3, 1.0). Biochemical B 12 deficiency showed a similar trend (P = 0.0002), with an adjusted prevalence ratio of 0.3 (95 % CI 0.1, 0.8). Prevalence ratios were similar in adults >50 years of age, although the prevalence of low B12 and biochemical deficiency was proportionally higher.Conclusions: Consumption of B12-containing supplements was associated with at least 50% lower prevalence of both low serum B12 and biochemical B12 deficiency in a nationally representative sample of US adults, suggesting increased consumption of B12 from supplements or from fortified foods may reduce the prevalence of B12 deficiency. Additionally, the current Recommended Daily Allowance for B12 of 2.4 μg may be insufficient for those aged >50 years.

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