Association of competitive and recreational sport participation with cardiac events in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

Results from the North American multidisciplinary study of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

Anne Christine Ruwald, Frank Marcus, N. A.Mark Estes, Mark Link, Scott McNitt, Bronislava Polonsky, Hugh Calkins, Jeffrey Towbin, Arthur J. Moss, Wojciech Zareba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: It has been proposed that competitive sport increases the risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTA) and death in patients with arrhythmogenic right-ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). However, it is unknown whether this only applies to competitive sport or if recreational sports activity also increases the risk of VTA/death. Methods and results: Probands diagnosed with ARVC according to the 2010 task force criteria for ARVC (n = 108) were included in the current analysis. At the time of enrolment, study participants were questioned about exercise level prior to and after ARVC diagnosis, within three categories of sports participation: competitive (n = 41), recreational (n = 48), and inactive (n = 19). Competitive sport was associated with a significantly higher risk of VTA/death when compared with both recreational sport [HR = 1.99 (1.21-3.28), P = 0.007] and inactive patients [HR = 2.05 (1.07-3.91), P = 0.030]. No increased risk of VTA/death was associated with recreational sport when compared with patients who were inactive [HR = 1.03 (0.54-1.97), P = 0.930]. Symptoms developed at an earlier age in patients who participated in competitive sport (30 ± 12 years), when compared with patients who participated in recreational sport (38 ± 17 years) (P = 0.015) and inactive patients (41 ± 11 years) (P = 0.002). No difference in age at first symptom was seen between patients who participated in recreational sport and inactive patients (P = 0.651). Conclusion: Competitive sport was associated with a two-fold increased risk of VTA/death, and earlier presentation of symptoms, when compared with inactive patients, and to patients who participated in recreational sport. When compared with inactive patients, recreational sport was not associated with earlier onset of symptoms or increased risk of VTA/death. Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT00024505.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1735-1743
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Heart Journal
Volume36
Issue number27
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 14 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia
Sports
Tachycardia
Advisory Committees

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Association of competitive and recreational sport participation with cardiac events in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy : Results from the North American multidisciplinary study of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. / Ruwald, Anne Christine; Marcus, Frank; Estes, N. A.Mark; Link, Mark; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Calkins, Hugh; Towbin, Jeffrey; Moss, Arthur J.; Zareba, Wojciech.

In: European Heart Journal, Vol. 36, No. 27, 14.07.2015, p. 1735-1743.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ruwald, Anne Christine ; Marcus, Frank ; Estes, N. A.Mark ; Link, Mark ; McNitt, Scott ; Polonsky, Bronislava ; Calkins, Hugh ; Towbin, Jeffrey ; Moss, Arthur J. ; Zareba, Wojciech. / Association of competitive and recreational sport participation with cardiac events in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy : Results from the North American multidisciplinary study of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. In: European Heart Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 27. pp. 1735-1743.
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abstract = "Aims: It has been proposed that competitive sport increases the risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTA) and death in patients with arrhythmogenic right-ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). However, it is unknown whether this only applies to competitive sport or if recreational sports activity also increases the risk of VTA/death. Methods and results: Probands diagnosed with ARVC according to the 2010 task force criteria for ARVC (n = 108) were included in the current analysis. At the time of enrolment, study participants were questioned about exercise level prior to and after ARVC diagnosis, within three categories of sports participation: competitive (n = 41), recreational (n = 48), and inactive (n = 19). Competitive sport was associated with a significantly higher risk of VTA/death when compared with both recreational sport [HR = 1.99 (1.21-3.28), P = 0.007] and inactive patients [HR = 2.05 (1.07-3.91), P = 0.030]. No increased risk of VTA/death was associated with recreational sport when compared with patients who were inactive [HR = 1.03 (0.54-1.97), P = 0.930]. Symptoms developed at an earlier age in patients who participated in competitive sport (30 ± 12 years), when compared with patients who participated in recreational sport (38 ± 17 years) (P = 0.015) and inactive patients (41 ± 11 years) (P = 0.002). No difference in age at first symptom was seen between patients who participated in recreational sport and inactive patients (P = 0.651). Conclusion: Competitive sport was associated with a two-fold increased risk of VTA/death, and earlier presentation of symptoms, when compared with inactive patients, and to patients who participated in recreational sport. When compared with inactive patients, recreational sport was not associated with earlier onset of symptoms or increased risk of VTA/death. Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT00024505.",
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T2 - Results from the North American multidisciplinary study of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

AU - Ruwald, Anne Christine

AU - Marcus, Frank

AU - Estes, N. A.Mark

AU - Link, Mark

AU - McNitt, Scott

AU - Polonsky, Bronislava

AU - Calkins, Hugh

AU - Towbin, Jeffrey

AU - Moss, Arthur J.

AU - Zareba, Wojciech

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