Association of Hemodialysis Treatment Time and Dose With Mortality and the Role of Race and Sex

Jessica E. Miller, Csaba P. Kovesdy, Allen R. Nissenson, Rajnish Mehrotra, Elani Streja, David Van Wyck, Sander Greenland, Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The association of survival with characteristics of thrice-weekly hemodialysis (HD) treatment, including dose or duration of treatment, has not been completely elucidated, especially in different race and sex categories. Study Design: We examined associations of time-averaged and quarterly varying (time-dependent) delivered HD dose and treatment time and 5-year (July 2001-June 2006) survival. Setting & Participants: 88,153 thrice-weekly-treated HD patients from DaVita dialysis clinics. Predictors: HD treatment dose (single-pool Kt/V) and treatment time. Outcomes & Other Measurements: 5-Year mortality. Results: Thrice-weekly treatment time < 3 hours (but ≥ 2.5 hours) per HD session compared with ≥ 3.5 hours (but < 5 hours) was associated with increased death risk independent of Kt/V dose. The greatest survival gain of higher HD dose was associated with a Kt/V approaching the 1.6-1.8 range, beyond which survival gain was minimal, nonexistent, or even tended to reverse in African American men and those with 4-5 hours of HD treatment. In non-Hispanic white women, Kt/V > 1.8 continued to show survival advantage trends, especially in time-dependent models. Limitations: Our results may incorporate uncontrolled confounding. Achieved Kt/V may have different associations than targeted Kt/V. Conclusions: HD treatment dose and time appear to have different associations with survival in different sex or race groups. Randomized controlled trials may be warranted to examine these associations across different racial and demographic groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-112
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Renal Dialysis
Mortality
Survival
Therapeutics
Dialysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Association of Hemodialysis Treatment Time and Dose With Mortality and the Role of Race and Sex. / Miller, Jessica E.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Nissenson, Allen R.; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Streja, Elani; Van Wyck, David; Greenland, Sander; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar.

In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol. 55, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 100-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, JE, Kovesdy, CP, Nissenson, AR, Mehrotra, R, Streja, E, Van Wyck, D, Greenland, S & Kalantar-Zadeh, K 2010, 'Association of Hemodialysis Treatment Time and Dose With Mortality and the Role of Race and Sex', American Journal of Kidney Diseases, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 100-112. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2009.08.007
Miller, Jessica E. ; Kovesdy, Csaba P. ; Nissenson, Allen R. ; Mehrotra, Rajnish ; Streja, Elani ; Van Wyck, David ; Greenland, Sander ; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar. / Association of Hemodialysis Treatment Time and Dose With Mortality and the Role of Race and Sex. In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 2010 ; Vol. 55, No. 1. pp. 100-112.
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