Association of non-adherence to antiepileptic drugs and seizures, quality of life, and productivity

Survey of patients with epilepsy and physicians

Collin A. Hovinga, Miya R. Asato, Ranjani Manjunath, James Wheless, Stephanie Phelps, Raj D. Sheth, Jesus E. Pina-Garza, Wendy M. Zingaro, Lisa S. Haskins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

126 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non-adherence to epilepsy medications can interfere with treatment and may adversely affect clinical outcomes, although few studies have examined this relationship. This study assessed barriers and drivers to adherence, its impact on quality of life, and the importance of the patient-physician relationship to adherence. Two cross-sectional online surveys were conducted among 408 adult patients with epilepsy and 175 neurologists who treat epilepsy patients. Twenty-nine percent of patients self-reported being non-adherent to antiepileptic medications in the prior month. Non-adherence was found to be associated with reduced seizure control, lowered quality of life, decreased productivity, seizure-related job loss, and seizure-related motor vehicle accidents. Patient-oriented epilepsy treatment programs and clear communication strategies to promote self-management and patients' understanding of epilepsy are essential to maximizing treatment and quality of life outcomes while also minimizing economic costs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)316-322
Number of pages7
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

Fingerprint

Anticonvulsants
Epilepsy
Seizures
Quality of Life
Physicians
Physician-Patient Relations
Motor Vehicles
Self Care
Accidents
Therapeutics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Communication
Economics
Surveys and Questionnaires
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Association of non-adherence to antiepileptic drugs and seizures, quality of life, and productivity : Survey of patients with epilepsy and physicians. / Hovinga, Collin A.; Asato, Miya R.; Manjunath, Ranjani; Wheless, James; Phelps, Stephanie; Sheth, Raj D.; Pina-Garza, Jesus E.; Zingaro, Wendy M.; Haskins, Lisa S.

In: Epilepsy and Behavior, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.08.2008, p. 316-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hovinga, Collin A. ; Asato, Miya R. ; Manjunath, Ranjani ; Wheless, James ; Phelps, Stephanie ; Sheth, Raj D. ; Pina-Garza, Jesus E. ; Zingaro, Wendy M. ; Haskins, Lisa S. / Association of non-adherence to antiepileptic drugs and seizures, quality of life, and productivity : Survey of patients with epilepsy and physicians. In: Epilepsy and Behavior. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 316-322.
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