Association of prostate cancer risk with insulin, glucose, and anthropometry in the baltimore longitudinal study of aging

J. Slade Hubbard, Sabine Rohrmann, Patricia K. Landis, E. Metter, Denis C. Muller, Reubin Andres, H. Ballentine Carter, Elizabeth A. Platz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To examine the relationship of insulin, glucose, and anthropometry with the subsequent risk of prostate cancer. Methods. The relative risk of prostate cancer by insulin, glucose, and anthropometric measures was evaluated in 823 male participants (87 patients with prostate cancer in 10,737 person-years of follow-up) of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging who had at least one fasting plasma insulin measurement, which was prediagnostic for those with prostate cancer. Age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted relative risks were estimated from Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results. Insulin concentrations were in the normal range (defined as less than 20 μU/mL) for 95.1% of participants. Fasting insulin and glucose levels were unrelated to prostate cancer risk in our overall analysis (P for trend = 0.56 and 0.45, respectively). The relative risk of prostate cancer for the second through fourth quartiles of the waist/hip ratio compared with the lowest quartile was 2.10, 1.96, and 2.06, respectively (P for trend = 0.32). Risk was unrelated to waist circumference and body mass index. Conclusions. The results of this study do not conclusively support positive associations of markers of insulin and glucose metabolism and obesity with prostate cancer. Additional larger prospective studies with repeated measure of these parameters are warranted to explore these associations further.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-258
Number of pages6
JournalUrology
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Baltimore
Anthropometry
Longitudinal Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms
Insulin
Glucose
Fasting
Waist-Hip Ratio
Waist Circumference
Proportional Hazards Models
Reference Values
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Association of prostate cancer risk with insulin, glucose, and anthropometry in the baltimore longitudinal study of aging. / Hubbard, J. Slade; Rohrmann, Sabine; Landis, Patricia K.; Metter, E.; Muller, Denis C.; Andres, Reubin; Carter, H. Ballentine; Platz, Elizabeth A.

In: Urology, Vol. 63, No. 2, 01.01.2004, p. 253-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hubbard, JS, Rohrmann, S, Landis, PK, Metter, E, Muller, DC, Andres, R, Carter, HB & Platz, EA 2004, 'Association of prostate cancer risk with insulin, glucose, and anthropometry in the baltimore longitudinal study of aging', Urology, vol. 63, no. 2, pp. 253-258. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2003.09.060
Hubbard, J. Slade ; Rohrmann, Sabine ; Landis, Patricia K. ; Metter, E. ; Muller, Denis C. ; Andres, Reubin ; Carter, H. Ballentine ; Platz, Elizabeth A. / Association of prostate cancer risk with insulin, glucose, and anthropometry in the baltimore longitudinal study of aging. In: Urology. 2004 ; Vol. 63, No. 2. pp. 253-258.
@article{a6477cd309c54976bb16952d93154b00,
title = "Association of prostate cancer risk with insulin, glucose, and anthropometry in the baltimore longitudinal study of aging",
abstract = "Objectives. To examine the relationship of insulin, glucose, and anthropometry with the subsequent risk of prostate cancer. Methods. The relative risk of prostate cancer by insulin, glucose, and anthropometric measures was evaluated in 823 male participants (87 patients with prostate cancer in 10,737 person-years of follow-up) of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging who had at least one fasting plasma insulin measurement, which was prediagnostic for those with prostate cancer. Age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted relative risks were estimated from Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results. Insulin concentrations were in the normal range (defined as less than 20 μU/mL) for 95.1{\%} of participants. Fasting insulin and glucose levels were unrelated to prostate cancer risk in our overall analysis (P for trend = 0.56 and 0.45, respectively). The relative risk of prostate cancer for the second through fourth quartiles of the waist/hip ratio compared with the lowest quartile was 2.10, 1.96, and 2.06, respectively (P for trend = 0.32). Risk was unrelated to waist circumference and body mass index. Conclusions. The results of this study do not conclusively support positive associations of markers of insulin and glucose metabolism and obesity with prostate cancer. Additional larger prospective studies with repeated measure of these parameters are warranted to explore these associations further.",
author = "Hubbard, {J. Slade} and Sabine Rohrmann and Landis, {Patricia K.} and E. Metter and Muller, {Denis C.} and Reubin Andres and Carter, {H. Ballentine} and Platz, {Elizabeth A.}",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.urology.2003.09.060",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "253--258",
journal = "Urology",
issn = "0090-4295",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of prostate cancer risk with insulin, glucose, and anthropometry in the baltimore longitudinal study of aging

AU - Hubbard, J. Slade

AU - Rohrmann, Sabine

AU - Landis, Patricia K.

AU - Metter, E.

AU - Muller, Denis C.

AU - Andres, Reubin

AU - Carter, H. Ballentine

AU - Platz, Elizabeth A.

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - Objectives. To examine the relationship of insulin, glucose, and anthropometry with the subsequent risk of prostate cancer. Methods. The relative risk of prostate cancer by insulin, glucose, and anthropometric measures was evaluated in 823 male participants (87 patients with prostate cancer in 10,737 person-years of follow-up) of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging who had at least one fasting plasma insulin measurement, which was prediagnostic for those with prostate cancer. Age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted relative risks were estimated from Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results. Insulin concentrations were in the normal range (defined as less than 20 μU/mL) for 95.1% of participants. Fasting insulin and glucose levels were unrelated to prostate cancer risk in our overall analysis (P for trend = 0.56 and 0.45, respectively). The relative risk of prostate cancer for the second through fourth quartiles of the waist/hip ratio compared with the lowest quartile was 2.10, 1.96, and 2.06, respectively (P for trend = 0.32). Risk was unrelated to waist circumference and body mass index. Conclusions. The results of this study do not conclusively support positive associations of markers of insulin and glucose metabolism and obesity with prostate cancer. Additional larger prospective studies with repeated measure of these parameters are warranted to explore these associations further.

AB - Objectives. To examine the relationship of insulin, glucose, and anthropometry with the subsequent risk of prostate cancer. Methods. The relative risk of prostate cancer by insulin, glucose, and anthropometric measures was evaluated in 823 male participants (87 patients with prostate cancer in 10,737 person-years of follow-up) of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging who had at least one fasting plasma insulin measurement, which was prediagnostic for those with prostate cancer. Age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted relative risks were estimated from Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results. Insulin concentrations were in the normal range (defined as less than 20 μU/mL) for 95.1% of participants. Fasting insulin and glucose levels were unrelated to prostate cancer risk in our overall analysis (P for trend = 0.56 and 0.45, respectively). The relative risk of prostate cancer for the second through fourth quartiles of the waist/hip ratio compared with the lowest quartile was 2.10, 1.96, and 2.06, respectively (P for trend = 0.32). Risk was unrelated to waist circumference and body mass index. Conclusions. The results of this study do not conclusively support positive associations of markers of insulin and glucose metabolism and obesity with prostate cancer. Additional larger prospective studies with repeated measure of these parameters are warranted to explore these associations further.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1242341931&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1242341931&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.urology.2003.09.060

DO - 10.1016/j.urology.2003.09.060

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 253

EP - 258

JO - Urology

JF - Urology

SN - 0090-4295

IS - 2

ER -