Association of Restless Legs Syndrome With Incident Parkinson's Disease

Szabolcs Szatmari, Daniel Bereczki, Katalin Fornadi, Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, Csaba Kovesdy, Miklos Z. Molnar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: The association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) has been extensively studied with inconclusive results; therefore, we prospectively examined the associations of the presence of RLS with development of incident PD.

Methods: From a nationally representative prospective cohort of almost 3.5 million US veterans (age: 60 ± 14 years, 93% male, median follow-up time of 7.8 years [interquartile range: 6.4-8.4 years]), we created a propensity-matched cohort of 100882 PD-free patients and examined the association between prevalent RLS and incident PD. This association was also assessed in the entire cohort. Associations were examined using Cox models.

Results: There were 68 incident PD events (0.13%, incidence rate 1.87 [1.48-2.37]/10000 patient-years) in the RLS-negative group, and 185 incident PD events (0.37%, incidence rate 4.72 [4.09-5.45]/10000 patient-years) in the RLS-positive group in the propensity-matched cohort. Prevalent RLS was associated with more than twofold higher risk of incident PD (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.57, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.95-3.39) compared to RLS-negative patients. Qualitatively similar results were found when we examined the entire 3.5 million cohort: Prevalent RLS was associated with more than twofold higher risk of incident PD (multivariable adjusted HR: 2.81, 95%CI: 2.41-3.27).

Conclusion: RLS and PD share common risk factors. In this large cohort of US veterans, we found that prevalent RLS is associated with higher risk of incident PD during 8 years of follow-up, suggesting that RLS could be an early clinical feature of incident PD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSleep
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Restless Legs Syndrome
Parkinson Disease
Veterans
Confidence Intervals
Incidence
Proportional Hazards Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Szatmari, S., Bereczki, D., Fornadi, K., Kalantar-Zadeh, K., Kovesdy, C., & Molnar, M. Z. (2017). Association of Restless Legs Syndrome With Incident Parkinson's Disease. Sleep, 40(2). https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsw065

Association of Restless Legs Syndrome With Incident Parkinson's Disease. / Szatmari, Szabolcs; Bereczki, Daniel; Fornadi, Katalin; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kovesdy, Csaba; Molnar, Miklos Z.

In: Sleep, Vol. 40, No. 2, 01.02.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szatmari, S, Bereczki, D, Fornadi, K, Kalantar-Zadeh, K, Kovesdy, C & Molnar, MZ 2017, 'Association of Restless Legs Syndrome With Incident Parkinson's Disease', Sleep, vol. 40, no. 2. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsw065
Szatmari S, Bereczki D, Fornadi K, Kalantar-Zadeh K, Kovesdy C, Molnar MZ. Association of Restless Legs Syndrome With Incident Parkinson's Disease. Sleep. 2017 Feb 1;40(2). https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsw065
Szatmari, Szabolcs ; Bereczki, Daniel ; Fornadi, Katalin ; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar ; Kovesdy, Csaba ; Molnar, Miklos Z. / Association of Restless Legs Syndrome With Incident Parkinson's Disease. In: Sleep. 2017 ; Vol. 40, No. 2.
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abstract = "Study Objectives: The association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) has been extensively studied with inconclusive results; therefore, we prospectively examined the associations of the presence of RLS with development of incident PD.Methods: From a nationally representative prospective cohort of almost 3.5 million US veterans (age: 60 ± 14 years, 93{\%} male, median follow-up time of 7.8 years [interquartile range: 6.4-8.4 years]), we created a propensity-matched cohort of 100882 PD-free patients and examined the association between prevalent RLS and incident PD. This association was also assessed in the entire cohort. Associations were examined using Cox models.Results: There were 68 incident PD events (0.13{\%}, incidence rate 1.87 [1.48-2.37]/10000 patient-years) in the RLS-negative group, and 185 incident PD events (0.37{\%}, incidence rate 4.72 [4.09-5.45]/10000 patient-years) in the RLS-positive group in the propensity-matched cohort. Prevalent RLS was associated with more than twofold higher risk of incident PD (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.57, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.95-3.39) compared to RLS-negative patients. Qualitatively similar results were found when we examined the entire 3.5 million cohort: Prevalent RLS was associated with more than twofold higher risk of incident PD (multivariable adjusted HR: 2.81, 95{\%}CI: 2.41-3.27).Conclusion: RLS and PD share common risk factors. In this large cohort of US veterans, we found that prevalent RLS is associated with higher risk of incident PD during 8 years of follow-up, suggesting that RLS could be an early clinical feature of incident PD.",
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AU - Kovesdy, Csaba

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AB - Study Objectives: The association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) has been extensively studied with inconclusive results; therefore, we prospectively examined the associations of the presence of RLS with development of incident PD.Methods: From a nationally representative prospective cohort of almost 3.5 million US veterans (age: 60 ± 14 years, 93% male, median follow-up time of 7.8 years [interquartile range: 6.4-8.4 years]), we created a propensity-matched cohort of 100882 PD-free patients and examined the association between prevalent RLS and incident PD. This association was also assessed in the entire cohort. Associations were examined using Cox models.Results: There were 68 incident PD events (0.13%, incidence rate 1.87 [1.48-2.37]/10000 patient-years) in the RLS-negative group, and 185 incident PD events (0.37%, incidence rate 4.72 [4.09-5.45]/10000 patient-years) in the RLS-positive group in the propensity-matched cohort. Prevalent RLS was associated with more than twofold higher risk of incident PD (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.57, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.95-3.39) compared to RLS-negative patients. Qualitatively similar results were found when we examined the entire 3.5 million cohort: Prevalent RLS was associated with more than twofold higher risk of incident PD (multivariable adjusted HR: 2.81, 95%CI: 2.41-3.27).Conclusion: RLS and PD share common risk factors. In this large cohort of US veterans, we found that prevalent RLS is associated with higher risk of incident PD during 8 years of follow-up, suggesting that RLS could be an early clinical feature of incident PD.

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