Association of sex hormones and glucose metabolism with the severity of multiple sclerosis

Nikolaos Triantafyllou, Pinelopi Thoda, Eleni Armeni, Demetrios Rizos, George Kaparos, Areti Augoulea, Andreas Alexandrou, Maria Creatsa, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Artemios Artemiades, Constantinos Panoulis, Irene Lambrinoudaki

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Abstract

Purpose/Aim of the study: We evaluated possible associations between the severity of multiple sclerosis (MS) and levels of sex hormones as well as biochemical parameters in a sample of ambulatory patients. Material and methods: This cross-sectional study recruited 133 adults (52 men, 66 premenopausal and 15 postmenopausal women), with relapsing-remitting MS. Fasting venous blood samples were drawn for biochemical and hormonal evaluation. These parameters were tested for possible associations with MS severity, assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)-scores. Results: Follicle-stimulating hormone correlated with mean EDSS scores (r = −0.369, p = 0.038) in the premenopausal subgroup. However, this association became non-significant in the age-adjusted multivariate analysis (p = 0.141; power = 67%, type α error 0.10). Free androgen exhibited a borderline negative effect on EDSS-scores in the subgroup of men (r = −0.367, p = 0.093), which was lost after adjusting for age and duration of disease (p = 0.192; statistical power = 93%, type α error 0.05). Levels of estradiol tended to affect disability status of postmenopausal women (normal–mild vs. severe impairment: 23.33 ± 11.73pg/mL vs. 14.74 ± 6.30pg/mL, p = 0.095). Levels of sex hormones or indices of glycemic metabolism did not differ between patients presenting with EDSS scores higher or lower than the median value. Conclusion: Sex hormones and indices of glucose metabolism exhibited only a middle effect on EDSS scoring, which was not independent from the presence of confounders like age and duration of MS. The present study highlights the need for additional research, in order to elucidate the role of sex hormones and insulin resistance in the course of MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)797-804
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Neuroscience
Volume126
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Multiple Sclerosis
Glucose
Glycemic Index
Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Women's Rights
Follicle Stimulating Hormone
Androgens
Insulin Resistance
Estradiol
Fasting
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Triantafyllou, N., Thoda, P., Armeni, E., Rizos, D., Kaparos, G., Augoulea, A., ... Lambrinoudaki, I. (2016). Association of sex hormones and glucose metabolism with the severity of multiple sclerosis. International Journal of Neuroscience, 126(9), 797-804. https://doi.org/10.3109/00207454.2015.1069825

Association of sex hormones and glucose metabolism with the severity of multiple sclerosis. / Triantafyllou, Nikolaos; Thoda, Pinelopi; Armeni, Eleni; Rizos, Demetrios; Kaparos, George; Augoulea, Areti; Alexandrou, Andreas; Creatsa, Maria; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Artemiades, Artemios; Panoulis, Constantinos; Lambrinoudaki, Irene.

In: International Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 126, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. 797-804.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Triantafyllou, N, Thoda, P, Armeni, E, Rizos, D, Kaparos, G, Augoulea, A, Alexandrou, A, Creatsa, M, Tsivgoulis, G, Artemiades, A, Panoulis, C & Lambrinoudaki, I 2016, 'Association of sex hormones and glucose metabolism with the severity of multiple sclerosis', International Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 126, no. 9, pp. 797-804. https://doi.org/10.3109/00207454.2015.1069825
Triantafyllou, Nikolaos ; Thoda, Pinelopi ; Armeni, Eleni ; Rizos, Demetrios ; Kaparos, George ; Augoulea, Areti ; Alexandrou, Andreas ; Creatsa, Maria ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Artemiades, Artemios ; Panoulis, Constantinos ; Lambrinoudaki, Irene. / Association of sex hormones and glucose metabolism with the severity of multiple sclerosis. In: International Journal of Neuroscience. 2016 ; Vol. 126, No. 9. pp. 797-804.
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AU - Kaparos, George

AU - Augoulea, Areti

AU - Alexandrou, Andreas

AU - Creatsa, Maria

AU - Tsivgoulis, Georgios

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AU - Panoulis, Constantinos

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