Associations between recommended levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life

Findings from the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey

David W. Brown, Lina S. Balluz, Gregory Heath, David G. Moriarty, Earl S. Ford, Wayne H. Giles, Ali H. Mokdad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

259 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Although the benefits of regular physical activity on morbidity and mortality are established, relationships between recommended levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) have not been described. The authors examined whether recommended levels of physical activity were associated with better HRQOL and perceived health status. Methods. Using data from 175,850 adults who participated in the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, the authors examined the independent relationship between recommended levels of moderate or vigorous physical activity and four measures of HRQOL developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, sex, education, smoking status, and body mass index. Results. The proportion of adults reporting 14 or more unhealthy days (physical or mental) was significantly lower among those who attained recommended levels of physical activity than physically inactive adults for all age, racial/ethnic, and sex groups. After multivariate adjustment, the relative odds of 14 or more unhealthy days (physical or mental) in those with the recommended level of activity compared to physically inactive adults was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.74) for adults aged 18-44 years, 0.40 (95% CI: 0.36, 0.45) for adults aged 45-64 years, and 0.41 (95% CI: 0.36, 0.46) for adults aged 65 years or older. The results persist even among adults with a chronic condition such as arthritis. Conclusion. These results highlight the need for health programs to increase participation in regular physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)520-528
Number of pages9
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Quality of Life
Exercise
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Social Adjustment
Sex Education
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Ethnic Groups
Health Status
Arthritis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models
Smoking
Morbidity
Mortality
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Associations between recommended levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life : Findings from the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. / Brown, David W.; Balluz, Lina S.; Heath, Gregory; Moriarty, David G.; Ford, Earl S.; Giles, Wayne H.; Mokdad, Ali H.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 5, 01.01.2003, p. 520-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, David W. ; Balluz, Lina S. ; Heath, Gregory ; Moriarty, David G. ; Ford, Earl S. ; Giles, Wayne H. ; Mokdad, Ali H. / Associations between recommended levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life : Findings from the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. In: Preventive Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 520-528.
@article{13b0c4cafe6e466d87c474795929122b,
title = "Associations between recommended levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life: Findings from the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey",
abstract = "Background. Although the benefits of regular physical activity on morbidity and mortality are established, relationships between recommended levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) have not been described. The authors examined whether recommended levels of physical activity were associated with better HRQOL and perceived health status. Methods. Using data from 175,850 adults who participated in the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, the authors examined the independent relationship between recommended levels of moderate or vigorous physical activity and four measures of HRQOL developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, sex, education, smoking status, and body mass index. Results. The proportion of adults reporting 14 or more unhealthy days (physical or mental) was significantly lower among those who attained recommended levels of physical activity than physically inactive adults for all age, racial/ethnic, and sex groups. After multivariate adjustment, the relative odds of 14 or more unhealthy days (physical or mental) in those with the recommended level of activity compared to physically inactive adults was 0.67 (95{\%} CI: 0.60, 0.74) for adults aged 18-44 years, 0.40 (95{\%} CI: 0.36, 0.45) for adults aged 45-64 years, and 0.41 (95{\%} CI: 0.36, 0.46) for adults aged 65 years or older. The results persist even among adults with a chronic condition such as arthritis. Conclusion. These results highlight the need for health programs to increase participation in regular physical activity.",
author = "Brown, {David W.} and Balluz, {Lina S.} and Gregory Heath and Moriarty, {David G.} and Ford, {Earl S.} and Giles, {Wayne H.} and Mokdad, {Ali H.}",
year = "2003",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0091-7435(03)00179-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "520--528",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between recommended levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life

T2 - Findings from the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey

AU - Brown, David W.

AU - Balluz, Lina S.

AU - Heath, Gregory

AU - Moriarty, David G.

AU - Ford, Earl S.

AU - Giles, Wayne H.

AU - Mokdad, Ali H.

PY - 2003/1/1

Y1 - 2003/1/1

N2 - Background. Although the benefits of regular physical activity on morbidity and mortality are established, relationships between recommended levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) have not been described. The authors examined whether recommended levels of physical activity were associated with better HRQOL and perceived health status. Methods. Using data from 175,850 adults who participated in the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, the authors examined the independent relationship between recommended levels of moderate or vigorous physical activity and four measures of HRQOL developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, sex, education, smoking status, and body mass index. Results. The proportion of adults reporting 14 or more unhealthy days (physical or mental) was significantly lower among those who attained recommended levels of physical activity than physically inactive adults for all age, racial/ethnic, and sex groups. After multivariate adjustment, the relative odds of 14 or more unhealthy days (physical or mental) in those with the recommended level of activity compared to physically inactive adults was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.74) for adults aged 18-44 years, 0.40 (95% CI: 0.36, 0.45) for adults aged 45-64 years, and 0.41 (95% CI: 0.36, 0.46) for adults aged 65 years or older. The results persist even among adults with a chronic condition such as arthritis. Conclusion. These results highlight the need for health programs to increase participation in regular physical activity.

AB - Background. Although the benefits of regular physical activity on morbidity and mortality are established, relationships between recommended levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) have not been described. The authors examined whether recommended levels of physical activity were associated with better HRQOL and perceived health status. Methods. Using data from 175,850 adults who participated in the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, the authors examined the independent relationship between recommended levels of moderate or vigorous physical activity and four measures of HRQOL developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, sex, education, smoking status, and body mass index. Results. The proportion of adults reporting 14 or more unhealthy days (physical or mental) was significantly lower among those who attained recommended levels of physical activity than physically inactive adults for all age, racial/ethnic, and sex groups. After multivariate adjustment, the relative odds of 14 or more unhealthy days (physical or mental) in those with the recommended level of activity compared to physically inactive adults was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.74) for adults aged 18-44 years, 0.40 (95% CI: 0.36, 0.45) for adults aged 45-64 years, and 0.41 (95% CI: 0.36, 0.46) for adults aged 65 years or older. The results persist even among adults with a chronic condition such as arthritis. Conclusion. These results highlight the need for health programs to increase participation in regular physical activity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0142138763&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0142138763&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0091-7435(03)00179-8

DO - 10.1016/S0091-7435(03)00179-8

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 520

EP - 528

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

IS - 5

ER -