Astrocyte-produced carbon monoxide and the carbon monoxide donor CORM-A1 protect against cerebrovascular dysfunction caused by prolonged neonatal asphyxia

Elena Parfenova, Massroor Pourcyrous, Alex L. Fedinec, Jianxiong Liu, Shyamali Basuroy, Charles Leffler

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Abstract

Neonatal asphyxia leads to cere brovascular disease and neurological complications via a mechanism that may involve oxidative stress. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an antioxidant messenger produced via a heme oxygenase (HO)-catalyzed reaction. Cortical astrocytes are the major cells in the brain that express constitutive HO-2 isoform. We tested the hypothesis that CO, produced by astrocytes, has cerebroprotective properties during neonatal asphyxia. We developed a survival model of prolonged asphyxia in newborn pigs that combines insults of severe hypoxia, hypercapnia, and acidosis while avoiding extreme hypotension and cerebral blood flow reduction. During the 60-min asphyxia, CO production by brain and astrocytes was continuously elevated. Excessive formation of reactive oxygen species during asphyxia/reventilation was potentiated by the HO inhibitor tin protoporphyrin, suggesting that endogenous CO has antioxidant effects. Cerebral vascular outcomes tested 24 and 48 h after asphyxia demonstrated the sustained impairment of cerebral vascular responses to astrocyte-and endothelium-specific vasodilators. Postasphyxia cerebral vascular dysfunction was aggravated in newborn pigs pretreated with tin protoporphyrin to inhibit brain HO/CO. The CO donor CO-releasing molecule-A1 (CORM-A1) reduced brain oxidative stress during asphyxia/reventilation and prevented postasphyxia cerebrovascular dysfunction. The antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects of HO/CO and CORM-A1 were confirmed in primary cultures of astrocytes from the neonatal pig brain exposed to glutamate excitotoxicity. Overall, prolonged neonatal asphyxia leads to neurovascular injury via an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism that is counteracted by an astrocyte-based constitutive antioxidant HO/CO system. We propose that gaseous CO or CO donors can be used as novel approaches for prevention of neonatal brain injury caused by prolonged asphyxia. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Asphyxia in newborn infants may lead to lifelong neurological disabilities. Using the model of prolonged asphyxia in newborn piglets, we propose novel antioxidant therapy based on systemic administration of low doses of a carbon monoxide donor that prevent loss of cerebral blood flow regulation and may improve the neurological outcome of asphyxia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)H978-H988
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume315
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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Asphyxia
Carbon Monoxide
Astrocytes
Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing)
Antioxidants
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Brain
Blood Vessels
Oxidative Stress
Swine
Newborn Infant
Hypercapnia
Acidosis
Vasodilator Agents
Hypotension
Brain Injuries
Endothelium
Glutamic Acid
Reactive Oxygen Species
Protein Isoforms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Astrocyte-produced carbon monoxide and the carbon monoxide donor CORM-A1 protect against cerebrovascular dysfunction caused by prolonged neonatal asphyxia",
abstract = "Neonatal asphyxia leads to cere brovascular disease and neurological complications via a mechanism that may involve oxidative stress. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an antioxidant messenger produced via a heme oxygenase (HO)-catalyzed reaction. Cortical astrocytes are the major cells in the brain that express constitutive HO-2 isoform. We tested the hypothesis that CO, produced by astrocytes, has cerebroprotective properties during neonatal asphyxia. We developed a survival model of prolonged asphyxia in newborn pigs that combines insults of severe hypoxia, hypercapnia, and acidosis while avoiding extreme hypotension and cerebral blood flow reduction. During the 60-min asphyxia, CO production by brain and astrocytes was continuously elevated. Excessive formation of reactive oxygen species during asphyxia/reventilation was potentiated by the HO inhibitor tin protoporphyrin, suggesting that endogenous CO has antioxidant effects. Cerebral vascular outcomes tested 24 and 48 h after asphyxia demonstrated the sustained impairment of cerebral vascular responses to astrocyte-and endothelium-specific vasodilators. Postasphyxia cerebral vascular dysfunction was aggravated in newborn pigs pretreated with tin protoporphyrin to inhibit brain HO/CO. The CO donor CO-releasing molecule-A1 (CORM-A1) reduced brain oxidative stress during asphyxia/reventilation and prevented postasphyxia cerebrovascular dysfunction. The antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects of HO/CO and CORM-A1 were confirmed in primary cultures of astrocytes from the neonatal pig brain exposed to glutamate excitotoxicity. Overall, prolonged neonatal asphyxia leads to neurovascular injury via an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism that is counteracted by an astrocyte-based constitutive antioxidant HO/CO system. We propose that gaseous CO or CO donors can be used as novel approaches for prevention of neonatal brain injury caused by prolonged asphyxia. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Asphyxia in newborn infants may lead to lifelong neurological disabilities. Using the model of prolonged asphyxia in newborn piglets, we propose novel antioxidant therapy based on systemic administration of low doses of a carbon monoxide donor that prevent loss of cerebral blood flow regulation and may improve the neurological outcome of asphyxia.",
author = "Elena Parfenova and Massroor Pourcyrous and Fedinec, {Alex L.} and Jianxiong Liu and Shyamali Basuroy and Charles Leffler",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Astrocyte-produced carbon monoxide and the carbon monoxide donor CORM-A1 protect against cerebrovascular dysfunction caused by prolonged neonatal asphyxia

AU - Parfenova, Elena

AU - Pourcyrous, Massroor

AU - Fedinec, Alex L.

AU - Liu, Jianxiong

AU - Basuroy, Shyamali

AU - Leffler, Charles

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Neonatal asphyxia leads to cere brovascular disease and neurological complications via a mechanism that may involve oxidative stress. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an antioxidant messenger produced via a heme oxygenase (HO)-catalyzed reaction. Cortical astrocytes are the major cells in the brain that express constitutive HO-2 isoform. We tested the hypothesis that CO, produced by astrocytes, has cerebroprotective properties during neonatal asphyxia. We developed a survival model of prolonged asphyxia in newborn pigs that combines insults of severe hypoxia, hypercapnia, and acidosis while avoiding extreme hypotension and cerebral blood flow reduction. During the 60-min asphyxia, CO production by brain and astrocytes was continuously elevated. Excessive formation of reactive oxygen species during asphyxia/reventilation was potentiated by the HO inhibitor tin protoporphyrin, suggesting that endogenous CO has antioxidant effects. Cerebral vascular outcomes tested 24 and 48 h after asphyxia demonstrated the sustained impairment of cerebral vascular responses to astrocyte-and endothelium-specific vasodilators. Postasphyxia cerebral vascular dysfunction was aggravated in newborn pigs pretreated with tin protoporphyrin to inhibit brain HO/CO. The CO donor CO-releasing molecule-A1 (CORM-A1) reduced brain oxidative stress during asphyxia/reventilation and prevented postasphyxia cerebrovascular dysfunction. The antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects of HO/CO and CORM-A1 were confirmed in primary cultures of astrocytes from the neonatal pig brain exposed to glutamate excitotoxicity. Overall, prolonged neonatal asphyxia leads to neurovascular injury via an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism that is counteracted by an astrocyte-based constitutive antioxidant HO/CO system. We propose that gaseous CO or CO donors can be used as novel approaches for prevention of neonatal brain injury caused by prolonged asphyxia. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Asphyxia in newborn infants may lead to lifelong neurological disabilities. Using the model of prolonged asphyxia in newborn piglets, we propose novel antioxidant therapy based on systemic administration of low doses of a carbon monoxide donor that prevent loss of cerebral blood flow regulation and may improve the neurological outcome of asphyxia.

AB - Neonatal asphyxia leads to cere brovascular disease and neurological complications via a mechanism that may involve oxidative stress. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an antioxidant messenger produced via a heme oxygenase (HO)-catalyzed reaction. Cortical astrocytes are the major cells in the brain that express constitutive HO-2 isoform. We tested the hypothesis that CO, produced by astrocytes, has cerebroprotective properties during neonatal asphyxia. We developed a survival model of prolonged asphyxia in newborn pigs that combines insults of severe hypoxia, hypercapnia, and acidosis while avoiding extreme hypotension and cerebral blood flow reduction. During the 60-min asphyxia, CO production by brain and astrocytes was continuously elevated. Excessive formation of reactive oxygen species during asphyxia/reventilation was potentiated by the HO inhibitor tin protoporphyrin, suggesting that endogenous CO has antioxidant effects. Cerebral vascular outcomes tested 24 and 48 h after asphyxia demonstrated the sustained impairment of cerebral vascular responses to astrocyte-and endothelium-specific vasodilators. Postasphyxia cerebral vascular dysfunction was aggravated in newborn pigs pretreated with tin protoporphyrin to inhibit brain HO/CO. The CO donor CO-releasing molecule-A1 (CORM-A1) reduced brain oxidative stress during asphyxia/reventilation and prevented postasphyxia cerebrovascular dysfunction. The antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects of HO/CO and CORM-A1 were confirmed in primary cultures of astrocytes from the neonatal pig brain exposed to glutamate excitotoxicity. Overall, prolonged neonatal asphyxia leads to neurovascular injury via an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism that is counteracted by an astrocyte-based constitutive antioxidant HO/CO system. We propose that gaseous CO or CO donors can be used as novel approaches for prevention of neonatal brain injury caused by prolonged asphyxia. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Asphyxia in newborn infants may lead to lifelong neurological disabilities. Using the model of prolonged asphyxia in newborn piglets, we propose novel antioxidant therapy based on systemic administration of low doses of a carbon monoxide donor that prevent loss of cerebral blood flow regulation and may improve the neurological outcome of asphyxia.

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