Asymmetric ground reaction forces and knee kinematics during squat after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background This bilateral squat study tests whether people with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have symmetric three-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRFs) and symmetric anterior–posterior (AP) translation rates of the femur with respect to the tibia when compared with healthy control subjects. We hypothesized that there would be no long-term asymmetry in knee kinematics and kinetics in ACL reconstructed subjects following surgery and rehabilitation. Methods Position and GRF data were collected on eight ACL reconstructed and eight control subjects during bilateral squat. The rate of relative AP translation was determined for each subject. Principal component models were developed for each of the three GRF waveforms. Principal component scores were used to assess symmetry within the ACL reconstructed group and within the control group. Results ACL reconstructed knees analyzed in early flexion during squat descent displayed a four-fold greater rate of change in anterior translation in the reconstructed knee relative to the contralateral side than did a similar comparison of normal knees. Differences were found between the ACL reconstructed subjects’ injured and uninjured limbs for all GRFs. Conclusions Subjects following ACL reconstruction had asymmetric GRFs and relative rates of AP translation at an average of seven years after ACL reconstructive surgery when compared with control subjects. Clinical Relevance These alterations in loading may lead to altered load distributions across the knee joint and may put some subjects at risk for future complications such as osteoarthritis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)820-825
Number of pages6
JournalKnee
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Biomechanical Phenomena
Knee
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
Knee Joint
Tibia
Osteoarthritis
Femur
Healthy Volunteers
Rehabilitation
Extremities
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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Asymmetric ground reaction forces and knee kinematics during squat after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. / Sanford, Brooke; Williams, John L.; Zucker-Levin, Audrey; Mihalko, William.

In: Knee, Vol. 23, No. 5, 01.10.2016, p. 820-825.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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