Attributions About Sexual Behavior, Attractiveness, and Health as a Function of Subjects’ and Targets’ Sex and Smoking Status

Eddie M. Clark, Robert Klesges, Robert A. Neimeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the effects of subjects’ sex and smoking status, as well as models’ sex and models’ smoking status on attributions regarding interpersonal attraction, sexual behavior, and health. Two hundred twenty-nine subjects watched videotapes of men and women smoking or not smoking as part of a study on first impressions. The results indicated that (a) smoking models were perceived as more sexually active than nonsmokers regardless of the subjects’ smoking status; (b) smoking female models were seen as less likable, less attractive, and less healthy than nonsmoking female models, whereas no such differences emerged between smoking and nonsmoking male models; and (c) although women reported no differences in their preference to engage in intimate behavior (e.g., petting, kissing) as a function of the male model’s smoking status, men preferred to engage in such intimate behaviors more with nonsmoking females than with smoking females. Implications of the results are discussed with regard to current theories of person perception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-216
Number of pages12
JournalBasic and Applied Social Psychology
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Reproductive Health
Sexual Behavior
Smoking
Videotape Recording

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Attributions About Sexual Behavior, Attractiveness, and Health as a Function of Subjects’ and Targets’ Sex and Smoking Status. / Clark, Eddie M.; Klesges, Robert; Neimeyer, Robert A.

In: Basic and Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.01.1992, p. 205-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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