Attributions of adolescents with type 1 diabetes in social situations

Relationship with expected adherence, diabetes stress, and metabolic control

Anthony A. Hains, Kristoffer S. Berlin, W. Hobart Davies, Elaine A. Parton, Ramin Alemzadeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To examine the relationships among negative attributions of friend reactions (NAFRs) within a social context, anticipated adherence difficulties, diabetes stress, and metabolic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A sample of 104 adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed instruments measuring demographics, attribution of friend reactions, anticipated adherence, and diabetes stress. Metabolic control was measured by HbA1c obtained during the clinic visit. RESULTS - Path analysis demonstrated an excellent fit of a model depicting an indirect relationship between NAFRs and metabolic control through the mechanisms of expected adherence difficulties and diabetes stress. CONCLUSIONS - Adolescents who make NAFRs are likely to find adherence difficult in social situations and have increased feelings of stress, with the latter associated with poorer metabolic control. Intervention efforts to address negative attributions may impact adherence behavior and feelings of stress, especially if specific contexts of self-care behavior are taken into account.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)818-822
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Emotions
Ambulatory Care
Self Care
Research Design
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Attributions of adolescents with type 1 diabetes in social situations : Relationship with expected adherence, diabetes stress, and metabolic control. / Hains, Anthony A.; Berlin, Kristoffer S.; Davies, W. Hobart; Parton, Elaine A.; Alemzadeh, Ramin.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.01.2006, p. 818-822.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hains, Anthony A. ; Berlin, Kristoffer S. ; Davies, W. Hobart ; Parton, Elaine A. ; Alemzadeh, Ramin. / Attributions of adolescents with type 1 diabetes in social situations : Relationship with expected adherence, diabetes stress, and metabolic control. In: Diabetes Care. 2006 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 818-822.
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AU - Parton, Elaine A.

AU - Alemzadeh, Ramin

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