Autophagy in the invading pathogen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autophagic degradation is of central importance to eukaryotic biology and has been implicated in a diverse array of developmental, differentiation, and disease related events in higher eukaryotes. We recently investigated the significance of autophagy in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Surprisingly our results demonstrate that autophagy is not required for C. albicans yeast-hypha or chlamydospore differentiation. Furthermore, a Candida mutant blocked in autophagy had no detectable virulence defect during interaction with a macrophage like cell line, or in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Herein we consider these results in the context of the pathogenic eukoryote, and raise important questions which remain to be addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-253
Number of pages3
JournalAutophagy
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Autophagy
Candida albicans
Hyphae
Candidiasis
Eukaryota
Candida
Virulence
Yeasts
Macrophages
Cell Line

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Autophagy in the invading pathogen. / Palmer, Glen.

In: Autophagy, Vol. 3, No. 3, 01.01.2007, p. 251-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Palmer, Glen. / Autophagy in the invading pathogen. In: Autophagy. 2007 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 251-253.
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