Autophagy in the pathogen Candida albicans

Glen Palmer, Michelle N. Kelly, Joy E. Sturtevant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autophagy is a major cellular process that facilitates the bulk degradation of eukaryotic macromolecules and organelles, through degradation within the lysosomal/vacuole compartment. This has been demonstrated to influence a diverse array of eukaryotic cell functions including adaptation, differentiation and developmental programmes. For example, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae autophagy is required for sporulation and survival of nitrogen starvation. The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans has the ability to colonize and cause disease within a diverse range of mammalian host sites. The ability to adapt and differentiate within the host is liable to be critical for host colonization and infection. Previous results indicated that the vacuole plays an important role in C. albicans adaptation to stress, differentiation, and survival within and injury of host cells. In this study the importance of vacuole-mediated degradation through the process of autophagy was investigated. This involved identification and deletion of ATG9, a C. albicans gene required for autophagy. The deletion strain was blocked in autophagy and the closely related cytoplasm to vacuole (cvt) trafficking pathway. This resulted in sensitivity to nitrogen starvation, but no defects in growth rate, vacuole morphology or resistance to other stresses. This indicates that the mutant has specific defects in autophagy/cvt trafficking. Given the importance of autophagy in the development and differentiation of other eukaryotes, it was surprising to find that the atg9Δ mutant was unaffected in either yeast-hypha or chlamydospore differentiation. Furthermore, the atg9Δ mutant survived within and killed a mouse macrophage-like cell line as efficiently as control strains. The data suggest that autophagy plays little or no role in C. albicans differentiation or during interaction with host cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-58
Number of pages8
JournalMicrobiology
Volume153
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Fingerprint

Autophagy
Candida albicans
Vacuoles
Starvation
Nitrogen
Hyphae
Eukaryotic Cells
Eukaryota
Organelles
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Cytoplasm
Yeasts
Macrophages
Cell Line
Wounds and Injuries
Growth
Infection
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology

Cite this

Autophagy in the pathogen Candida albicans. / Palmer, Glen; Kelly, Michelle N.; Sturtevant, Joy E.

In: Microbiology, Vol. 153, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 51-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Palmer, Glen ; Kelly, Michelle N. ; Sturtevant, Joy E. / Autophagy in the pathogen Candida albicans. In: Microbiology. 2007 ; Vol. 153, No. 1. pp. 51-58.
@article{2102652fa4294769bbe392304972b19b,
title = "Autophagy in the pathogen Candida albicans",
abstract = "Autophagy is a major cellular process that facilitates the bulk degradation of eukaryotic macromolecules and organelles, through degradation within the lysosomal/vacuole compartment. This has been demonstrated to influence a diverse array of eukaryotic cell functions including adaptation, differentiation and developmental programmes. For example, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae autophagy is required for sporulation and survival of nitrogen starvation. The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans has the ability to colonize and cause disease within a diverse range of mammalian host sites. The ability to adapt and differentiate within the host is liable to be critical for host colonization and infection. Previous results indicated that the vacuole plays an important role in C. albicans adaptation to stress, differentiation, and survival within and injury of host cells. In this study the importance of vacuole-mediated degradation through the process of autophagy was investigated. This involved identification and deletion of ATG9, a C. albicans gene required for autophagy. The deletion strain was blocked in autophagy and the closely related cytoplasm to vacuole (cvt) trafficking pathway. This resulted in sensitivity to nitrogen starvation, but no defects in growth rate, vacuole morphology or resistance to other stresses. This indicates that the mutant has specific defects in autophagy/cvt trafficking. Given the importance of autophagy in the development and differentiation of other eukaryotes, it was surprising to find that the atg9Δ mutant was unaffected in either yeast-hypha or chlamydospore differentiation. Furthermore, the atg9Δ mutant survived within and killed a mouse macrophage-like cell line as efficiently as control strains. The data suggest that autophagy plays little or no role in C. albicans differentiation or during interaction with host cells.",
author = "Glen Palmer and Kelly, {Michelle N.} and Sturtevant, {Joy E.}",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1099/mic.0.2006/001610-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "153",
pages = "51--58",
journal = "Microbiology",
issn = "1350-0872",
publisher = "Society for General Microbiology",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Autophagy in the pathogen Candida albicans

AU - Palmer, Glen

AU - Kelly, Michelle N.

AU - Sturtevant, Joy E.

PY - 2007/1/1

Y1 - 2007/1/1

N2 - Autophagy is a major cellular process that facilitates the bulk degradation of eukaryotic macromolecules and organelles, through degradation within the lysosomal/vacuole compartment. This has been demonstrated to influence a diverse array of eukaryotic cell functions including adaptation, differentiation and developmental programmes. For example, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae autophagy is required for sporulation and survival of nitrogen starvation. The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans has the ability to colonize and cause disease within a diverse range of mammalian host sites. The ability to adapt and differentiate within the host is liable to be critical for host colonization and infection. Previous results indicated that the vacuole plays an important role in C. albicans adaptation to stress, differentiation, and survival within and injury of host cells. In this study the importance of vacuole-mediated degradation through the process of autophagy was investigated. This involved identification and deletion of ATG9, a C. albicans gene required for autophagy. The deletion strain was blocked in autophagy and the closely related cytoplasm to vacuole (cvt) trafficking pathway. This resulted in sensitivity to nitrogen starvation, but no defects in growth rate, vacuole morphology or resistance to other stresses. This indicates that the mutant has specific defects in autophagy/cvt trafficking. Given the importance of autophagy in the development and differentiation of other eukaryotes, it was surprising to find that the atg9Δ mutant was unaffected in either yeast-hypha or chlamydospore differentiation. Furthermore, the atg9Δ mutant survived within and killed a mouse macrophage-like cell line as efficiently as control strains. The data suggest that autophagy plays little or no role in C. albicans differentiation or during interaction with host cells.

AB - Autophagy is a major cellular process that facilitates the bulk degradation of eukaryotic macromolecules and organelles, through degradation within the lysosomal/vacuole compartment. This has been demonstrated to influence a diverse array of eukaryotic cell functions including adaptation, differentiation and developmental programmes. For example, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae autophagy is required for sporulation and survival of nitrogen starvation. The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans has the ability to colonize and cause disease within a diverse range of mammalian host sites. The ability to adapt and differentiate within the host is liable to be critical for host colonization and infection. Previous results indicated that the vacuole plays an important role in C. albicans adaptation to stress, differentiation, and survival within and injury of host cells. In this study the importance of vacuole-mediated degradation through the process of autophagy was investigated. This involved identification and deletion of ATG9, a C. albicans gene required for autophagy. The deletion strain was blocked in autophagy and the closely related cytoplasm to vacuole (cvt) trafficking pathway. This resulted in sensitivity to nitrogen starvation, but no defects in growth rate, vacuole morphology or resistance to other stresses. This indicates that the mutant has specific defects in autophagy/cvt trafficking. Given the importance of autophagy in the development and differentiation of other eukaryotes, it was surprising to find that the atg9Δ mutant was unaffected in either yeast-hypha or chlamydospore differentiation. Furthermore, the atg9Δ mutant survived within and killed a mouse macrophage-like cell line as efficiently as control strains. The data suggest that autophagy plays little or no role in C. albicans differentiation or during interaction with host cells.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846284924&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846284924&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1099/mic.0.2006/001610-0

DO - 10.1099/mic.0.2006/001610-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 17185534

AN - SCOPUS:33846284924

VL - 153

SP - 51

EP - 58

JO - Microbiology

JF - Microbiology

SN - 1350-0872

IS - 1

ER -