Avoiding and Treating Heterotopic Ossification After Total Hip Arthroplasty

Torrance A. Walker, William Mihalko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The occurrence of heterotopic ossification (HO) after total hip arthroplasty has been reported between 2% and 90% and depends on the risk factors associated with the patient population being reported. Risk factors such as male gender, operative approach, patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, previous hip operations, or traumatic injury have all been reported. Preventive measures can be implemented using oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, or radiation treatment in higher risk individuals. Once HO has started to form, there are no treatment modalities that will halt its progression. If severe HO results that significantly hampers patient function, then excision may be considered with planned measures to prevent recurrence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-134
Number of pages7
JournalSeminars in Arthroplasty
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

Fingerprint

Heterotopic Ossification
Arthroplasty
Hip
Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis
Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Radiation
Recurrence
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Avoiding and Treating Heterotopic Ossification After Total Hip Arthroplasty. / Walker, Torrance A.; Mihalko, William.

In: Seminars in Arthroplasty, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.09.2012, p. 128-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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