Babbling, chewing, and sucking: Oromandibular coordination at 9 months

Roger W. Steeve, Christopher A. Moore, Jordan R. Green, Kevin Reilly, Jacki Ruark McMurtrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The ontogeny of mandibular control is important for understanding the general neurophysiologic development for speech and alimentary behaviors. Prior investigations suggest that mandibular control is organized distinctively across speech and nonspeech tasks in 15-month-olds and adults and that, with development, these extant forms of motor control primarily undergo refinement and rescaling. The present investigation was designed to evaluate whether these coordinative infrastructures for alimentary behaviors and speech are evident during the earliest period of their co-occurrence. Method: Electromyographic (EMG) signals were obtained from the mandibular muscle groups of 15 typically developing 9-month-old children during sucking, chewing, and speech. Results: Unlike prior investigations of 12- and 15-month-olds and adults, 9-month-olds' analyses of peak correlations among agonist and antagonist comparisons of mandibular EMG data revealed weak coupling during sucking, chewing, and babble; associated lag values for antagonist muscle groups indicated greater synchrony during alimentary behaviors and less synchrony during babble. Unlike the speech data of 15-month-olds, 9-month-olds exhibited consistent results across speech subtasks. Conclusion: These findings were consistent with previous results in which mandibular coordination across behaviors was more variable for younger age groups, whereas the essential organization of each behavior closely reflected that seen in older infants and adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1390-1404
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

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Mastication
Muscles
Babbling
age group
infant
Age Groups
infrastructure
organization
Values

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Babbling, chewing, and sucking : Oromandibular coordination at 9 months. / Steeve, Roger W.; Moore, Christopher A.; Green, Jordan R.; Reilly, Kevin; McMurtrey, Jacki Ruark.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 51, No. 6, 01.12.2008, p. 1390-1404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steeve, Roger W. ; Moore, Christopher A. ; Green, Jordan R. ; Reilly, Kevin ; McMurtrey, Jacki Ruark. / Babbling, chewing, and sucking : Oromandibular coordination at 9 months. In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. 2008 ; Vol. 51, No. 6. pp. 1390-1404.
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