Bacteremia due to Providencia stuartii

Review of 49 episodes

Timothy Woods, Chatrchai Watanakunakorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We reviewed cases of Providencia stuartii bacteremia at a large community teaching hospital during a 12-year period (1981 to 1992). None of the infections were hospital-acquired. Of the 49 patients, 47 (96%) came from a nursing home, and 45 (92%) had a long-term indwelling Foley catheter. The urinary tract was definitely proven to be the source of bacteremia in 35 patients (71%) and was the probable source in another 5 patients (11%). Polymicrobial bacteremia occurred in 25 patients (51%). The overall mortality rate during hospitalization was 25%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-224
Number of pages4
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume89
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Providencia
Bacteremia
Indwelling Catheters
Community Hospital
Cross Infection
Nursing Homes
Urinary Tract
Teaching Hospitals
Hospitalization
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bacteremia due to Providencia stuartii : Review of 49 episodes. / Woods, Timothy; Watanakunakorn, Chatrchai.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 89, No. 2, 01.01.1996, p. 221-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Woods, Timothy ; Watanakunakorn, Chatrchai. / Bacteremia due to Providencia stuartii : Review of 49 episodes. In: Southern Medical Journal. 1996 ; Vol. 89, No. 2. pp. 221-224.
@article{34ccfc203e1246838549d52a72fb88f0,
title = "Bacteremia due to Providencia stuartii: Review of 49 episodes",
abstract = "We reviewed cases of Providencia stuartii bacteremia at a large community teaching hospital during a 12-year period (1981 to 1992). None of the infections were hospital-acquired. Of the 49 patients, 47 (96{\%}) came from a nursing home, and 45 (92{\%}) had a long-term indwelling Foley catheter. The urinary tract was definitely proven to be the source of bacteremia in 35 patients (71{\%}) and was the probable source in another 5 patients (11{\%}). Polymicrobial bacteremia occurred in 25 patients (51{\%}). The overall mortality rate during hospitalization was 25{\%}.",
author = "Timothy Woods and Chatrchai Watanakunakorn",
year = "1996",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00007611-199602000-00013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "89",
pages = "221--224",
journal = "Southern Medical Journal",
issn = "0038-4348",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bacteremia due to Providencia stuartii

T2 - Review of 49 episodes

AU - Woods, Timothy

AU - Watanakunakorn, Chatrchai

PY - 1996/1/1

Y1 - 1996/1/1

N2 - We reviewed cases of Providencia stuartii bacteremia at a large community teaching hospital during a 12-year period (1981 to 1992). None of the infections were hospital-acquired. Of the 49 patients, 47 (96%) came from a nursing home, and 45 (92%) had a long-term indwelling Foley catheter. The urinary tract was definitely proven to be the source of bacteremia in 35 patients (71%) and was the probable source in another 5 patients (11%). Polymicrobial bacteremia occurred in 25 patients (51%). The overall mortality rate during hospitalization was 25%.

AB - We reviewed cases of Providencia stuartii bacteremia at a large community teaching hospital during a 12-year period (1981 to 1992). None of the infections were hospital-acquired. Of the 49 patients, 47 (96%) came from a nursing home, and 45 (92%) had a long-term indwelling Foley catheter. The urinary tract was definitely proven to be the source of bacteremia in 35 patients (71%) and was the probable source in another 5 patients (11%). Polymicrobial bacteremia occurred in 25 patients (51%). The overall mortality rate during hospitalization was 25%.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030044204&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030044204&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00007611-199602000-00013

DO - 10.1097/00007611-199602000-00013

M3 - Article

VL - 89

SP - 221

EP - 224

JO - Southern Medical Journal

JF - Southern Medical Journal

SN - 0038-4348

IS - 2

ER -