Balloon-Expandable Covered Stent Therapy of Complex Endovascular Pathology

Wesley Giles, Christopher Lesar, Luke Erdoes, Larry Richard Sprouse, Stuart Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study was designed to investigate our hypotheses that balloon-expandable covered stents display acceptable function over longitudinal follow-up in patients with complex vascular pathology and provide a suitable alternative for the treatment of recurrent in-stent restenosis. All stents were Atrium iCast, which is a balloon-mounted, polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent with a 6F/7F delivery system. A retrospective review was performed of 49 patients with 66 stented lesions. Data were analyzed with life tables and t-tests. The most commonly treated vessels were the iliac (61%) and renal (24%) arteries. Indications for covered stent placement were unstable atheromatous lesions (50%), recurrent in-stent restenosis (24%), aneurysm (8%), aortic bifurcation reconstruction (7.5%), dissection (4.5%), endovascular aneurysm repair-related (4.5%), and stent fracture (1.5%). Patency was assessed by angiogram or duplex ultrasonography. The primary end point was patency and secondary end points were technical success and access-site complications. Mean follow-up was 13 months (range 1.5-25). The technical success rate was 97%. Unsuccessful outcomes were due to deployment error (n = 1) and stent malpositioning (n = 1). The cohort (n = 64) 6- and 12-month primary patency rates were 96% and 84%, respectively. Twelve-month assisted primary patency was 98%. Iliac artery stents (n = 38) had a primary patency of 97% at 6 months and 84% at 12 months with an assisted primary patency of 100% at 12 months. Renal artery stents (n = 16) had a primary patency of 92% at 6 months and 72% at 12 months with an assisted primary patency of 92% at 6 and 12 months. Stents placed for recurrent in-stent restenosis (n = 16) had a primary patency of 85%, assisted primary patency of 93%, and a 15% restenosis rate at 12 months. Specifically, stents placed for renal artery recurrent in-stent restenosis (n = 10) had a primary patency of 73%, assisted primary patency of 82%, and a restenosis rate of 27%. The restenosis rate included two renal artery occlusions in patients noncompliant with clopidogrel use and resulted in ipsilateral kidney loss in both patients. In-stent peak systolic velocities decreased significantly (p < 0.05) from preoperation to 12 months in iliac stents and to 18 months in renal stents. Ankle-brachial index increased significantly in iliac stents from preoperation (0.62 ± 0.18) to 18 months (0.86 ± 0.16). Successful exclusion of atheromatous lesions and aneurysm/dissection/endoleak was 100%. Access-site complications occurred in 6%: pseudoaneurysm (n = 2), dissection (n = 1), and bleeding (n = 1). Balloon-expandable covered stents have an acceptable primary patency with an excellent assisted patency after salvage angioplasty. The clinical utility of this technology is broad for the treatment of aneurysms, extravasation, unstable atheromatous lesions, and recurrent in-stent restenosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)762-768
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

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Stents
Pathology
Therapeutics
Renal Artery
Aneurysm
Dissection
clopidogrel
Endoleak
Kidney
Ankle Brachial Index
Life Tables
Aortic Aneurysm
Iliac Artery
False Aneurysm
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Angioplasty

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Balloon-Expandable Covered Stent Therapy of Complex Endovascular Pathology. / Giles, Wesley; Lesar, Christopher; Erdoes, Luke; Sprouse, Larry Richard; Myers, Stuart.

In: Annals of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 22, No. 6, 01.11.2008, p. 762-768.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Giles, Wesley ; Lesar, Christopher ; Erdoes, Luke ; Sprouse, Larry Richard ; Myers, Stuart. / Balloon-Expandable Covered Stent Therapy of Complex Endovascular Pathology. In: Annals of Vascular Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 762-768.
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