Barriers to implementing the group B streptococcal prevention guidelines

Vicky Cárdenas, Robert Davis, Mary Beth Hasselquist, Ann Zavitkovsky, Anne Schuchat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Group B streptococcal disease is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis in the United States. We assessed predictors of compliance with the consensus guidelines for perinatal group B streptococcus disease prevention at two Group Health Cooperative hospitals. Methods: A descriptive and cohort analysis was conducted of failure to comply with the screening-based approach to group B streptococcus prevention among singleton birth pregnancies in two Group Health Cooperative hospitals, September 1, 1996 to December 31, 1997. We studied determinants of failure to screen pregnant women for group B streptococcus at 35 to 37 weeks' gestation and failure to deliver intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis to Group B streptococcus-positive women. Results: Nearly 28 percent of 1969 women delivering at two Group Health Cooperative hospitals were not screened appropriately for group B streptococcus. Women who were not screened properly were more likely to be in their teens. A short length of hospital stay before delivery was the strongest predictor of the lack of administration of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis to infected multiparas at delivery. Group B streptococcus-positive women without pregnancy complications were less likely to receive intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis than infected women with complications. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that to improve group B streptococcus disease prevention, screening efforts should focus on teenage women, and intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis delivery efforts should be aimed at low-risk women with precipitous labor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-290
Number of pages6
JournalBirth
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 30 2002

Fingerprint

Streptococcus agalactiae
Guidelines
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Length of Stay
Health
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Streptococcus
Pregnant Women
Cohort Studies
Parturition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Cárdenas, V., Davis, R., Hasselquist, M. B., Zavitkovsky, A., & Schuchat, A. (2002). Barriers to implementing the group B streptococcal prevention guidelines. Birth, 29(4), 285-290. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1523-536X.2002.00203.x

Barriers to implementing the group B streptococcal prevention guidelines. / Cárdenas, Vicky; Davis, Robert; Hasselquist, Mary Beth; Zavitkovsky, Ann; Schuchat, Anne.

In: Birth, Vol. 29, No. 4, 30.11.2002, p. 285-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cárdenas, V, Davis, R, Hasselquist, MB, Zavitkovsky, A & Schuchat, A 2002, 'Barriers to implementing the group B streptococcal prevention guidelines', Birth, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 285-290. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1523-536X.2002.00203.x
Cárdenas, Vicky ; Davis, Robert ; Hasselquist, Mary Beth ; Zavitkovsky, Ann ; Schuchat, Anne. / Barriers to implementing the group B streptococcal prevention guidelines. In: Birth. 2002 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 285-290.
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