Behavior therapy for depressed breast cancer patients: Predictors of treatment outcome

Derek Richard Hopko, Kerry Cannity, Crystal Constance McIndoo, Audrey Ashton File, Marlena M. Ryba, Caroline Gray Clark, John Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the most common psychiatric disorder among breast cancer patients and is associated with substantial functional impairment. Although several outcome studies have explored the utility of psychotherapy for breast cancer patients with subsyndromal depression symptoms, only a few clinical trials have explored the efficacy of behavior therapy for patients with well-diagnosed MDD. An additional limitation of this research is that little is known about factors that best predict treatment outcome. Method: In the context of a recent randomized trial of behavior activation and problem-solving therapy for depressed breast cancer patients (n = 80; Hopko et al., 2011), this study explored predictors of treatment outcome with selected demographic (age, education, marital status, occupational status), psychosocial (pretreatment depression and environmental reward, coexistent anxiety disorders, social support, history of psychotherapy) and cancer-related variables (cancer stage, duration of cancer diagnosis, and cancer treatment). Results: Positive treatment outcome as defined by Beck Depression Inventory-II (Beck et al., 1996) response and remission criteria was associated with being married, increased social support, not actively undergoing cancer treatment during psychotherapy, and having a history of psychotherapy. Conclusions: The efficacy of behavior therapy for depressed breast cancer patients may depend on several patient variables. Implications for the provision of behavior therapy for breast cancer patients are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-231
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Behavior Therapy
Breast Neoplasms
Psychotherapy
Major Depressive Disorder
Neoplasms
Depression
Social Support
Marital Status
Anxiety Disorders
Reward
Psychiatry
Therapeutics
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Clinical Trials
Education
Equipment and Supplies
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Behavior therapy for depressed breast cancer patients : Predictors of treatment outcome. / Hopko, Derek Richard; Cannity, Kerry; McIndoo, Crystal Constance; File, Audrey Ashton; Ryba, Marlena M.; Clark, Caroline Gray; Bell, John.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 83, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 225-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hopko, Derek Richard ; Cannity, Kerry ; McIndoo, Crystal Constance ; File, Audrey Ashton ; Ryba, Marlena M. ; Clark, Caroline Gray ; Bell, John. / Behavior therapy for depressed breast cancer patients : Predictors of treatment outcome. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2015 ; Vol. 83, No. 1. pp. 225-231.
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