Bence Jones proteinemia

Alan Solomon, John L. Fahey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bence Jones protein was found in appreciable concentrations in the serum of ten patients with multiple myeloma. The Bence Jones proteins were distinguished from the larger (and more commonly occurring) serum myeloma proteins by immunochemical and physicochemical technics. The serum Bence Jones proteins were shown to sediment at 3.4S to 4.2S in the ultracentrifuge and to have the characteristic thermal solubility properties of urinary Bence Jones proteins. Immunoelectrophoretic findings provided a good clue to the presence of Bence Jones proteinemia. Both type I and II Bence Jones proteins were found in our patients. Comparison of the serum and urinary Bence Jones proteins by electrophoretic, ultracentrifugal and immunochemical technics showed them to be similar in each case. Bence Jones proteinemia never occurred in the absence of Bence Jones proteinuria. Evidence that the serum level of Bence Jones protein reflects the rate of Bence Jones protein synthesis and the degree of renal impairment of the patient is summarized. Renal impairment was a common feature of the ten patients studied. In other respects the course of the disease was similar to that observed in other patients with multiple myeloma. There was no evidence that the Bence Jones protein produced damage unless it precipitated in the renal tubule.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-222
Number of pages17
JournalThe American journal of medicine
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1964
Externally publishedYes

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Bence Jones Protein
Multiple Myeloma
Kidney
Blood Proteins
Serum
Myeloma Proteins
Proteinuria
Solubility
Hot Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bence Jones proteinemia. / Solomon, Alan; Fahey, John L.

In: The American journal of medicine, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.01.1964, p. 206-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Solomon, Alan ; Fahey, John L. / Bence Jones proteinemia. In: The American journal of medicine. 1964 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 206-222.
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