Bence-Jones Proteins and Light Chains of Immunoglobulins

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Considerable progress in our understanding of the functional implications of the immunochemical, biochemical, physicochemical, metabolic, and genetic properties of normal immunoglobulins has been achieved through the study of Bence-Jones proteins, myeloma proteins, Waldenstrm macroglobulins, and their subunits. These homogeneous proteins are produced by neoplastic immunoglobulin-synthesizing cells characteristically present in the bone marrow or lymphoid tissue of patients with multiple myeloma and related plasma cell-lymphocytic dyscrasias. Because they can be readily isolated and purified from serum and urine specimens and because they are generally available in quantities sufficient for detailed analyses, these proteins have become invaluable research material for studies designed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-23
Number of pages7
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume294
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1976

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Bence Jones Protein
Immunoglobulin Light Chains
Immunoglobulins
Myeloma Proteins
Macroglobulins
Paraproteinemias
Lymphoid Tissue
Multiple Myeloma
Proteins
Bone Marrow
Urine
Bone and Bones
Serum
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bence-Jones Proteins and Light Chains of Immunoglobulins. / Solomon, Alan.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 294, No. 1, 01.01.1976, p. 17-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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