Bence Jones Proteins: Malignant or Benign?

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over a century elapsed between Henry Bence Jones' discovery of a urinary protein with unusual thermal properties in patients with multiple myeloma1 and Edelman and Gally's demonstration2 that this curious protein was the light polypeptide portion (kappa or lambda chain) of the immunoglobulin molecule. It is now known that normal urine contains very small amounts of a mixture of free kappa and lambda light chains of polyclonal origin, but Bence Jones proteinuria denotes the presence of a monoclonal light chain of either the kappa or the lambda type. Bence Jones proteins, far from being a laboratory curiosity, are historically among.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)605-607
Number of pages3
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume306
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 11 1982

Fingerprint

Bence Jones Protein
Light
Immunoglobulin lambda-Chains
Exploratory Behavior
Proteinuria
Proteins
Hot Temperature
Urine
Peptides

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bence Jones Proteins : Malignant or Benign? / Solomon, Alan.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 306, No. 10, 11.03.1982, p. 605-607.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

@article{c69a3f4dad7b4cdc857a6f4682fac852,
title = "Bence Jones Proteins: Malignant or Benign?",
abstract = "Over a century elapsed between Henry Bence Jones' discovery of a urinary protein with unusual thermal properties in patients with multiple myeloma1 and Edelman and Gally's demonstration2 that this curious protein was the light polypeptide portion (kappa or lambda chain) of the immunoglobulin molecule. It is now known that normal urine contains very small amounts of a mixture of free kappa and lambda light chains of polyclonal origin, but Bence Jones proteinuria denotes the presence of a monoclonal light chain of either the kappa or the lambda type. Bence Jones proteins, far from being a laboratory curiosity, are historically among.",
author = "Alan Solomon",
year = "1982",
month = "3",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1056/NEJM198203113061010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "306",
pages = "605--607",
journal = "New England Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0028-4793",
publisher = "Massachussetts Medical Society",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bence Jones Proteins

T2 - Malignant or Benign?

AU - Solomon, Alan

PY - 1982/3/11

Y1 - 1982/3/11

N2 - Over a century elapsed between Henry Bence Jones' discovery of a urinary protein with unusual thermal properties in patients with multiple myeloma1 and Edelman and Gally's demonstration2 that this curious protein was the light polypeptide portion (kappa or lambda chain) of the immunoglobulin molecule. It is now known that normal urine contains very small amounts of a mixture of free kappa and lambda light chains of polyclonal origin, but Bence Jones proteinuria denotes the presence of a monoclonal light chain of either the kappa or the lambda type. Bence Jones proteins, far from being a laboratory curiosity, are historically among.

AB - Over a century elapsed between Henry Bence Jones' discovery of a urinary protein with unusual thermal properties in patients with multiple myeloma1 and Edelman and Gally's demonstration2 that this curious protein was the light polypeptide portion (kappa or lambda chain) of the immunoglobulin molecule. It is now known that normal urine contains very small amounts of a mixture of free kappa and lambda light chains of polyclonal origin, but Bence Jones proteinuria denotes the presence of a monoclonal light chain of either the kappa or the lambda type. Bence Jones proteins, far from being a laboratory curiosity, are historically among.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020059082&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020059082&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1056/NEJM198203113061010

DO - 10.1056/NEJM198203113061010

M3 - Editorial

C2 - 7057817

AN - SCOPUS:0020059082

VL - 306

SP - 605

EP - 607

JO - New England Journal of Medicine

JF - New England Journal of Medicine

SN - 0028-4793

IS - 10

ER -