Bio-medical ontologies maintenance and change management

Arash Shaban-Nejad, Volker Haarslev

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Things change. Words change, meanings and context change. To manage a large volume of evolving bio-medical data of various types, one needs to employ several techniques from areas such as knowledge representation, semantic web and databases. Many of these techniques require a formal description of a part of the real world. Ontologies can provide a set of shared and precisely defined terms in various degrees of formality to describe a particular domain of interest. When the knowledge changes, then the related definitions will be altered. Changes to ontologies may occur for many reasons. The issues arising from ontological change can affect the validity of information in applications that are tightly bound to concepts in a particular ontological context. Many knowledge-based systems are now reaching a stage where they need a change management strategy to update their ontological knowledge. This area is becoming increasingly important in science as high throughput techniques frequently necessitate updates to existing scientific "truths". In this chapter, we survey and review state of the art change management in bio-ontologies as well as some of the available tools and techniques in this area. We also survey various potential changes in biomedical ontologies, with actual examples from some of the most popular ontologies in the biomedical domain. In addition we investigate the potential of some of the advanced formalisms in this context by proposing our formal method for analyzing and supporting ontology evolution and change management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBiomedical Data and Applications
EditorsAmandeep Sidhu, Tharam Dilliom
Pages143-168
Number of pages26
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 22 2009

Publication series

NameStudies in Computational Intelligence
Volume224
ISSN (Print)1860-949X

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Ontology
Formal methods
Knowledge representation
Knowledge based systems
Semantic Web
Throughput

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

Shaban-Nejad, A., & Haarslev, V. (2009). Bio-medical ontologies maintenance and change management. In A. Sidhu, & T. Dilliom (Eds.), Biomedical Data and Applications (pp. 143-168). (Studies in Computational Intelligence; Vol. 224). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02193-0_6

Bio-medical ontologies maintenance and change management. / Shaban-Nejad, Arash; Haarslev, Volker.

Biomedical Data and Applications. ed. / Amandeep Sidhu; Tharam Dilliom. 2009. p. 143-168 (Studies in Computational Intelligence; Vol. 224).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Shaban-Nejad, A & Haarslev, V 2009, Bio-medical ontologies maintenance and change management. in A Sidhu & T Dilliom (eds), Biomedical Data and Applications. Studies in Computational Intelligence, vol. 224, pp. 143-168. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02193-0_6
Shaban-Nejad A, Haarslev V. Bio-medical ontologies maintenance and change management. In Sidhu A, Dilliom T, editors, Biomedical Data and Applications. 2009. p. 143-168. (Studies in Computational Intelligence). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02193-0_6
Shaban-Nejad, Arash ; Haarslev, Volker. / Bio-medical ontologies maintenance and change management. Biomedical Data and Applications. editor / Amandeep Sidhu ; Tharam Dilliom. 2009. pp. 143-168 (Studies in Computational Intelligence).
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