Biological factors in dental caries enamel structure and the caries process in the dynamic process of demineralization and remineralization (part 2)

John Hicks, Franklin Garcia-Godoy, Catherine Flaitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dental caries is a complex disease process that afflicts a large proportion of the world's population, regardless of gender, age and ethnicity, although it does tend to affect more indivduals with a low socioeconomic status to a greater extent. The physicochemical properties of the mineral comprising the tooth surface and subsurface modulate the development, arrestment and remineralization of dental caries. Post-eruption maturation of enamel surfaces and exposed root surfaces is important in order for more susceptible mineral phases to be modified by incorporation of soluble fluoride from the plaque into dental hydroxyapatite. The chemical reactions that occur during acidic conditions when tooth mineral dissolves (critical pH) are determined by the supersaturation of calcium and phosphate within plaque and saliva, as well as if fluoride is present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-124
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
Volume28
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Biological Factors
Dental Caries
Dental Enamel
Minerals
Fluorides
Tooth
Dental Plaque
Durapatite
Saliva
Social Class
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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