Biological tooth replacement and repair

Cimara Ferreira, R. S. Magini, P. T. Sharpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Implantology is an ancient art that can be traced back several thousand years. Although modern implants have improved substantially over the last 50 years, the basic principle remains unchanged: replace a missing tooth with an inert non-biological material (metal, ceramic etc.). The rate of technological improvements in implants has reached a plateau and substantial new developments will require major changes to the basic approach. Rapid advances in the development of cell-based therapies in medicine suggest that similar approaches should be considered in dental treatment. The use of cell-based implants that will develop into natural teeth and the employment of cells to restore/repair caries lesions is thus an area of considerable interest and excitement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)933-939
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Oral Rehabilitation
Volume34
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Tooth
Ceramics
Art
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Metals
Medicine
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Biological tooth replacement and repair. / Ferreira, Cimara; Magini, R. S.; Sharpe, P. T.

In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Vol. 34, No. 12, 01.12.2007, p. 933-939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferreira, Cimara ; Magini, R. S. ; Sharpe, P. T. / Biological tooth replacement and repair. In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation. 2007 ; Vol. 34, No. 12. pp. 933-939.
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