Biology of premature ageing in survivors of cancer

Margaret C. Cupit-Link, James L. Kirkland, Kirsten K. Ness, Gregory Armstrong, Tamar Tchkonia, Nathan K. Lebrasseur, Saro H. Armenian, Kathryn J. Ruddy, Shahrukh K. Hashmi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over 30 million cancer survivors exist worldwide. Survivors have an earlier onset and higher incidence of chronic comorbidities, including endocrinopathies, cardiac dysfunction, osteoporosis, pulmonary fibrosis, secondary cancers and frailty than the general population; however, the fundamental basis of these changes at the cellular level is unknown. An electronic search was performed on Embase, Medline In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Original articles addressing the cellular biology of ageing and/or the mechanisms of cancer therapies similar to ageing mechanisms were included, and references of these articles were reviewed for further search. We found multiple biological process of ageing at the cellular level and their association with cancer therapies, as well as with clinical effects. The direct effects of various chemotherapies and radiation on telomere length, senescent cells, epigenetic modifications and microRNA were found. We review the effects of cancer therapies on recognised hallmarks of ageing. Long-term comorbidities seen in cancer survivors mimic the phenotypes of ageing and likely result from the interaction between therapeutic exposures and the underlying biology of ageing. Long-term follow-up of cancer survivors and research on prevention strategies should be pursued to increase the length and quality of life among the growing population of cancer survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere000250
JournalESMO Open
Volume2
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Premature Aging
Survivors
Neoplasms
Comorbidity
Biological Phenomena
Pulmonary Fibrosis
Cell Aging
Telomere
Therapeutics
MicroRNAs
Epigenomics
Population
Osteoporosis
Cell Biology
Quality of Life
Radiation
Phenotype
Drug Therapy
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Cupit-Link, M. C., Kirkland, J. L., Ness, K. K., Armstrong, G., Tchkonia, T., Lebrasseur, N. K., ... Hashmi, S. K. (2017). Biology of premature ageing in survivors of cancer. ESMO Open, 2(5), [e000250]. https://doi.org/10.1136/esmoopen-2017-000250

Biology of premature ageing in survivors of cancer. / Cupit-Link, Margaret C.; Kirkland, James L.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Armstrong, Gregory; Tchkonia, Tamar; Lebrasseur, Nathan K.; Armenian, Saro H.; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; Hashmi, Shahrukh K.

In: ESMO Open, Vol. 2, No. 5, e000250, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Cupit-Link, MC, Kirkland, JL, Ness, KK, Armstrong, G, Tchkonia, T, Lebrasseur, NK, Armenian, SH, Ruddy, KJ & Hashmi, SK 2017, 'Biology of premature ageing in survivors of cancer', ESMO Open, vol. 2, no. 5, e000250. https://doi.org/10.1136/esmoopen-2017-000250
Cupit-Link MC, Kirkland JL, Ness KK, Armstrong G, Tchkonia T, Lebrasseur NK et al. Biology of premature ageing in survivors of cancer. ESMO Open. 2017 Dec 1;2(5). e000250. https://doi.org/10.1136/esmoopen-2017-000250
Cupit-Link, Margaret C. ; Kirkland, James L. ; Ness, Kirsten K. ; Armstrong, Gregory ; Tchkonia, Tamar ; Lebrasseur, Nathan K. ; Armenian, Saro H. ; Ruddy, Kathryn J. ; Hashmi, Shahrukh K. / Biology of premature ageing in survivors of cancer. In: ESMO Open. 2017 ; Vol. 2, No. 5.
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