Biomechanical analysis of the C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation technique

Denis Diangelo, Thomas H. Jansen, Eugene C. Eckstein, Scott T. Dull, Kevin Foley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Transarticular screw fixation (TASF) is an accepted surgical treatment for pathologic C1-C2 instability due to trauma, ligamentous laxity or degenerative disorders. Previous biomechanical tests have found C1-C2 TASF with a posterior graft to have increased rotational and shear stiffness, as compared with posterior wiring techniques. A complete mechanical analysis of the C1-C2 TASF construct was performed to determine the primary mode of loading. The greatest stress placed on the fixated C1-C2 motion segment was a bending stress developed during flexion and extension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-360
Number of pages2
JournalAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED
Volume33
StatePublished - 1996

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Electric wiring
Grafts
Stiffness

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Biomechanical analysis of the C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation technique. / Diangelo, Denis; Jansen, Thomas H.; Eckstein, Eugene C.; Dull, Scott T.; Foley, Kevin.

In: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED, Vol. 33, 1996, p. 359-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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