Biomechanical testing simulation of a cadaver spine specimen

Development and evaluation study

Hyung Soo Ahn, Denis Diangelo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN. This article describes a computer model of the cadaver cervical spine specimen and virtual biomechanical testing. OBJECTIVES. To develop a graphics-oriented, multibody model of a cadaver cervical spine and to build a virtual laboratory simulator for the biomechanical testing using physics-based dynamic simulation techniques. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Physics-based computer simulations apply the laws of physics to solid bodies with defined material properties. This technique can be used to create a virtual simulator for the biomechanical testing of a human cadaver spine. An accurate virtual model and simulation would complement tissue-based in vitro studies by providing a consistent test bed with minimal variability and by reducing cost. METHOD. The geometry of cervical vertebrae was created from computed tomography images. Joints linking adjacent vertebrae were modeled as a triple-joint complex, comprised of intervertebral disc joints in the anterior region, 2 facet joints in the posterior region, and the surrounding ligament structure. A virtual laboratory simulation of an in vitro testing protocol was performed to evaluate the model responses during flexion, extension, and lateral bending. RESULTS. For kinematic evaluation, the rotation of motion segment unit, coupling behaviors, and 3-dimensional helical axes of motion were analyzed. The simulation results were in correlation with the findings of in vitro tests and published data. For kinetic evaluation, the forces of the intervertebral discs and facet joints of each segment were determined and visually animated. CONCLUSIONS. This methodology produced a realistic visualization of in vitro experiment, and allowed for the analyses of the kinematics and kinetics of the cadaver cervical spine. With graphical illustrations and animation features, this modeling technique has provided vivid and intuitive information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSpine
Volume32
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

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Cadaver
Spine
Physics
Zygapophyseal Joint
Joints
Intervertebral Disc
Biomechanical Phenomena
Computer Simulation
Cervical Vertebrae
Ligaments
Tomography
Costs and Cost Analysis
In Vitro Techniques

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Biomechanical testing simulation of a cadaver spine specimen : Development and evaluation study. / Ahn, Hyung Soo; Diangelo, Denis.

In: Spine, Vol. 32, No. 11, 01.05.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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