Biotransformation of protriptyline by filamentous fungi and yeasts

Benjamin Duhart, D. Zhang, J. Deck, J. P. Freeman, C. E. Cerniglia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. The potential of various fungi to metabolize protriptyline (an extensively used antidepressant) was studied to investigate similarities between mammalian and microbial metabolism. 2. Metabolites produced by each organism were isolated by high-pressure liquid chromatography and identified by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. The metabolites identified in one or more fungi were 2-hydroxyprotriptyline, N-desmethyl-protriptyline, N-acetylprotriptyline, N-acetoxyprotriptyline, 14-oxo-N-desmethylprotriptyline, 2-hydroxy-acetoxyprotriptyline and 3-(5-hydrodibenzo[bf][7]annulen-5-yl)-propanoic acid. 3. Among 27 filamentous fungi and yeast species screened, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pini 2380 metabolized 97% of the protriptyline added. Several other fungi screened gave significant metabolism of protriptyline, including Cunninghamella echinulata ATCC 42616 (67%), C. elegans ATCC 9245 (17%), C. elegans ATCC 36112 (22%), C. phaeospora ATCC 22110 (50%), F. moniliforme MRC-826 (33%) and F. solani 3179 (12%). 4. F. oxysporum f. sp. pini produced phase I and phase II metabolites and thus is a suitable microbial model for protriptyline metabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)733-746
Number of pages14
JournalXenobiotica
Volume29
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 17 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Protriptyline
Biotransformation
Fungi
Yeast
Yeasts
Metabolites
Metabolism
Cunninghamella
High pressure liquid chromatography
Fusarium
Antidepressive Agents
Mass spectrometry
Mass Spectrometry
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Nuclear magnetic resonance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Duhart, B., Zhang, D., Deck, J., Freeman, J. P., & Cerniglia, C. E. (1999). Biotransformation of protriptyline by filamentous fungi and yeasts. Xenobiotica, 29(7), 733-746. https://doi.org/10.1080/004982599238353

Biotransformation of protriptyline by filamentous fungi and yeasts. / Duhart, Benjamin; Zhang, D.; Deck, J.; Freeman, J. P.; Cerniglia, C. E.

In: Xenobiotica, Vol. 29, No. 7, 17.08.1999, p. 733-746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duhart, B, Zhang, D, Deck, J, Freeman, JP & Cerniglia, CE 1999, 'Biotransformation of protriptyline by filamentous fungi and yeasts', Xenobiotica, vol. 29, no. 7, pp. 733-746. https://doi.org/10.1080/004982599238353
Duhart, Benjamin ; Zhang, D. ; Deck, J. ; Freeman, J. P. ; Cerniglia, C. E. / Biotransformation of protriptyline by filamentous fungi and yeasts. In: Xenobiotica. 1999 ; Vol. 29, No. 7. pp. 733-746.
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