Blast from the past

A retrospective analysis of blast-induced head injury

Kristin E. Yu, Justin M. Murphy, Jack Tsao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Because of the sharp increase in the number of military personnel exposed to explosive blasts in combat, research has been dedicated toward understanding the impact of explosions on the brain. It is important to consider that potential injuries that military personnel sustain may be both in the form of physical injury as well as "invisible" neuronal and psychological damage. Since the inception of the study of blast science in the Medieval and Renaissance eras, significant improvements have been made in the historical record keeping and biomedical analysis of blast injuries. This editorial comments on the evolution of blast science and the recognition of neurological sequelae from both the historical and scientific perspectives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-18
Number of pages2
JournalNeurologist
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 23 2016

Fingerprint

Military Personnel
Craniocerebral Trauma
Blast Injuries
Explosions
Wounds and Injuries
Psychology
Brain
Research
Renaissance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Blast from the past : A retrospective analysis of blast-induced head injury. / Yu, Kristin E.; Murphy, Justin M.; Tsao, Jack.

In: Neurologist, Vol. 21, No. 2, 23.03.2016, p. 17-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yu, Kristin E. ; Murphy, Justin M. ; Tsao, Jack. / Blast from the past : A retrospective analysis of blast-induced head injury. In: Neurologist. 2016 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 17-18.
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