Blepharoplasty in graves’ disease

Stephen J. Laquis, Barrett G. Haik, James Fleming

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Facial changes due to aging are primarily a result of atrophy of body tissues, particularly of the skin, fat, muscle, and their associated connective tissue attachments. Corresponding histological changes include a flattened epidermal-dermal junction, loss of elastic fibers, and decreased collagen fibers (1). There are numerous structural and dynamic changes that the different regions of the aging face undergo. Aging-related changes of the eyelids are of particular concern to most people because the eyes are the central area of focus during human interaction and conversation. Common clinical manifestations of aging eyelids include primarily the formation of periocular rhytids and upper eyelid skin redundancy (Fig. 1). Other signs of the aging eyelid include laxity in the preseptal lid anatomy, including skin and orbicularis muscle, and weakening of the orbital septum, both of which allow prolapse of orbital fat. Furthermore, upper eyelid ptosis, horizontal lower eyelid laxity, and midfacial descent all contribute to the aging appearance of the periocular and midface area (Table 1).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThyroid Eye Disease
Subtitle of host publicationDiagnosis and Treatment
PublisherCRC Press
Pages423-432
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9780824743871
ISBN (Print)9780824707712
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Blepharoplasty
Graves Disease
Eyelids
Skin
Fats
Blepharoptosis
Muscles
Elastic Tissue
Prolapse
Connective Tissue
Atrophy
Anatomy
Collagen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Laquis, S. J., Haik, B. G., & Fleming, J. (2002). Blepharoplasty in graves’ disease. In Thyroid Eye Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment (pp. 423-432). CRC Press.

Blepharoplasty in graves’ disease. / Laquis, Stephen J.; Haik, Barrett G.; Fleming, James.

Thyroid Eye Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment. CRC Press, 2002. p. 423-432.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Laquis, SJ, Haik, BG & Fleming, J 2002, Blepharoplasty in graves’ disease. in Thyroid Eye Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment. CRC Press, pp. 423-432.
Laquis SJ, Haik BG, Fleming J. Blepharoplasty in graves’ disease. In Thyroid Eye Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment. CRC Press. 2002. p. 423-432
Laquis, Stephen J. ; Haik, Barrett G. ; Fleming, James. / Blepharoplasty in graves’ disease. Thyroid Eye Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment. CRC Press, 2002. pp. 423-432
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