Blood Aldosterone-to-Renin Ratio, Ambulatory Blood Pressure, and Left Ventricular Mass in Children

Rongling Li, Phyllis Richey, Thomas G. DiSessa, Bruce S. Alpert, Deborah P. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the blood aldosterone-to-renin ratio (ARR) and its relationship to ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and left ventricular mass (LVM) in children. Study design: A cross-sectional clinical study was conducted in 102 children (71.6% African American; 62.7% male) ranging in age from 7 to 18 years (mean, 13.6 years; median, 14 years). ABP (24-hour monitoring) was expressed as blood pressure index (BPI; mean blood pressure/95th percentile by sex and height). LVM was measured by echocardiography and expressed as an index (LVMI = g/height [m]2.7). Regression analyses were used to estimate associations. Results: African-American children had significantly lower serum aldosterone concentration and plasma renin activity compared with European-American children (aldosterone: 5.9 ng/dL vs 11.4 ng/dL, P < .0001; renin: 1.6 ng/mL/hour vs 2.8 ng/mL/hour, P = .01). However, ARR was not significantly different by race. ARR was not associated with 24-hour ABP but was significantly associated with LVMI (β = 0.4 g/m2.7; P = .02) after adjustment for the ratio of 24-hour urine Na to creatinine excretion, body mass index z- score, and ABP index. Conclusions: The data indicated a significant association between ARR and LVMI, but not ABP, in children, suggesting early cardiac remodeling associated with a high ARR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-175
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume155
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

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Aldosterone
Renin
Blood Pressure
African Americans
Echocardiography
Creatinine
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Urine
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Blood Aldosterone-to-Renin Ratio, Ambulatory Blood Pressure, and Left Ventricular Mass in Children. / Li, Rongling; Richey, Phyllis; DiSessa, Thomas G.; Alpert, Bruce S.; Jones, Deborah P.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 155, No. 2, 01.08.2009, p. 170-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Rongling ; Richey, Phyllis ; DiSessa, Thomas G. ; Alpert, Bruce S. ; Jones, Deborah P. / Blood Aldosterone-to-Renin Ratio, Ambulatory Blood Pressure, and Left Ventricular Mass in Children. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2009 ; Vol. 155, No. 2. pp. 170-175.
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