Blood contaminated amniotic fluid and the lamellar body count fetal lung maturity test

Kevin C. Visconti, Craig Towers, Mark Hennessy, Bobby Howard, Stephanie Porter, Beth Weitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine if maternal blood contamination falsely elevates the lamellar body count fetal lung maturity test. STUDY DESIGN: Fifty mothers undergoing amniocentesis for fetal lung maturity consented to participation in the study. For each participant a bloodcontaminated sample using the patient’s own blood was run in tandem with the noncontaminated sample used for clinical practice. RESULTS: Of the 50 study patient samples the lamellar body count decreased by ≥3,000/μL in 33 (66%) and remained unchanged in 16 (32%). In only 1 case did the value increase—the actual result of 37,000/μL increased to 44,000/μL, both of which exceeded the mature level in our institution. CONCLUSION: Maternal blood contamination of amniotic fluid does not falsely increase the lamellar body count in 98% of cases. The result was falsely lowered in 2 out of 3 cases. Therefore, a mature lamellar body count test result in a blood-contaminated sample is reliable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-222
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Reproductive Medicine
Volume60
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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Amniotic Fluid
Lung
Mothers
Amniocentesis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Blood contaminated amniotic fluid and the lamellar body count fetal lung maturity test. / Visconti, Kevin C.; Towers, Craig; Hennessy, Mark; Howard, Bobby; Porter, Stephanie; Weitz, Beth.

In: Journal of Reproductive Medicine, Vol. 60, No. 3, 01.06.2015, p. 219-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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