Blood magnesium, and the interaction with calcium, on the risk of high-grade prostate cancer

Qi Dai, Saundra S. Motley, Joseph A. Smith, Raoul Concepcion, Daniel Barocas, Susan Byerly, Jay Fowke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ionized calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) compete as essential messengers to regulate cell proliferation and inflammation. We hypothesized that inadequate Mg levels, perhaps relative to Ca levels (e.g. a high Ca/Mg ratio) are associated with greater prostate cancer risk. Study Design: In this biomarker sub-study of the Nashville Men's Health Study (NMHS), we included 494 NMHS participants, consisting of 98 high-grade (Gleason≥7) and 100 low-grade cancer cases, 133 prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) cases, and 163 controls without cancer or PIN at biopsy. Linear and logistic regression were used to determine associations between blood Ca, Mg, and the Ca/Mg ratio across controls and case groups while adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results: Serum Mg levels were significantly lower, while the Ca/Mg ratio was significantly higher, among high-grade cases vs. controls (p = 0.04, p = 0.01, respectively). Elevated Mg was significantly associated with a lower risk of high-grade prostate cancer (OR = 0.26 (0.09, 0.85)). An elevated Ca/Mg ratio was also associated with an increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer (OR = 2.81 (1.24, 6.36) adjusted for serum Ca and Mg). In contrast, blood Ca levels were not significantly associated with prostate cancer or PIN.Mg, Ca, or Ca/Mg levels were not associated with low-grade cancer, PIN, PSA levels, prostate volume, or BPH treatment. Conclusion: Low blood Mg levels and a high Ca/Mg ratio were significantly associated with high-grade prostate cancer. These findings suggest Mg affects prostate cancer risk perhaps through interacting with Ca.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere18237
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 6 2011
Externally publishedYes

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prostatic neoplasms
Magnesium
Prostatic Neoplasms
magnesium
Blood
Calcium
calcium
blood
neoplasms
Men's Health
Neoplasms
blood serum
Prostate
Biopsy
Cell proliferation
Biomarkers
Serum
Logistics
biopsy
Linear Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Dai, Q., Motley, S. S., Smith, J. A., Concepcion, R., Barocas, D., Byerly, S., & Fowke, J. (2011). Blood magnesium, and the interaction with calcium, on the risk of high-grade prostate cancer. PLoS One, 6(4), [e18237]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018237

Blood magnesium, and the interaction with calcium, on the risk of high-grade prostate cancer. / Dai, Qi; Motley, Saundra S.; Smith, Joseph A.; Concepcion, Raoul; Barocas, Daniel; Byerly, Susan; Fowke, Jay.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 4, e18237, 06.05.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dai Q, Motley SS, Smith JA, Concepcion R, Barocas D, Byerly S et al. Blood magnesium, and the interaction with calcium, on the risk of high-grade prostate cancer. PLoS One. 2011 May 6;6(4). e18237. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018237
Dai, Qi ; Motley, Saundra S. ; Smith, Joseph A. ; Concepcion, Raoul ; Barocas, Daniel ; Byerly, Susan ; Fowke, Jay. / Blood magnesium, and the interaction with calcium, on the risk of high-grade prostate cancer. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 4.
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AB - Background: Ionized calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) compete as essential messengers to regulate cell proliferation and inflammation. We hypothesized that inadequate Mg levels, perhaps relative to Ca levels (e.g. a high Ca/Mg ratio) are associated with greater prostate cancer risk. Study Design: In this biomarker sub-study of the Nashville Men's Health Study (NMHS), we included 494 NMHS participants, consisting of 98 high-grade (Gleason≥7) and 100 low-grade cancer cases, 133 prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) cases, and 163 controls without cancer or PIN at biopsy. Linear and logistic regression were used to determine associations between blood Ca, Mg, and the Ca/Mg ratio across controls and case groups while adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results: Serum Mg levels were significantly lower, while the Ca/Mg ratio was significantly higher, among high-grade cases vs. controls (p = 0.04, p = 0.01, respectively). Elevated Mg was significantly associated with a lower risk of high-grade prostate cancer (OR = 0.26 (0.09, 0.85)). An elevated Ca/Mg ratio was also associated with an increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer (OR = 2.81 (1.24, 6.36) adjusted for serum Ca and Mg). In contrast, blood Ca levels were not significantly associated with prostate cancer or PIN.Mg, Ca, or Ca/Mg levels were not associated with low-grade cancer, PIN, PSA levels, prostate volume, or BPH treatment. Conclusion: Low blood Mg levels and a high Ca/Mg ratio were significantly associated with high-grade prostate cancer. These findings suggest Mg affects prostate cancer risk perhaps through interacting with Ca.

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