Blood pressure management in acute stroke

A long-standing debate

Konstantinos Spengos, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Nikolaos Zakopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although elevated blood pressure (BP) levels are a common complication of acute stroke, whether of ischaemic or haemorrhagic type, a long-standing debate exists regarding the management of post-stroke hypertension. In the absence of solid, randomised data from controlled trials, the current observational evidence allows different approaches, since theoretical arguments exist for both lowering BP in the setting of acute stroke (reduce the risk of stroke recurrence, of subsequent oedema formation, of rebleeding and haematoma expansion in patients with cerebral bleeding) as well as leaving raised BP levels untreated (avoid reduction in cerebral perfusion pressure and blood flow to viable ischaemic tissue in the absence of normal autoregulation). The present review will summarize the evidence for and against the therapeutic manipulation of BP in acute stroke provided by the currently available observational studies and randomised trials, consider the ongoing clinical trials in this area and address the present recommendations regarding this conflicting issue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-135
Number of pages13
JournalEuropean Neurology
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stroke
Blood Pressure
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Hematoma
Observational Studies
Edema
Homeostasis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Clinical Trials
Hemorrhage
Hypertension
Recurrence
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Blood pressure management in acute stroke : A long-standing debate. / Spengos, Konstantinos; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Zakopoulos, Nikolaos.

In: European Neurology, Vol. 55, No. 3, 01.06.2006, p. 123-135.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Spengos, Konstantinos ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Zakopoulos, Nikolaos. / Blood pressure management in acute stroke : A long-standing debate. In: European Neurology. 2006 ; Vol. 55, No. 3. pp. 123-135.
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