Blood to Brain Transport after Newborn Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

Robert Mirro, William M. Armstead, David W. Busija, Charles Leffler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

These experiments examine the transfer of urea, sodium, and sucrose from blood to brain in an animal model of newborn cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Cerebral ischemia (20 min) was produced in anesthetized, ventilated piglets by increasing intracranial pressure above mean arterial blood pressure, thereby reducing cerebral perfusion pressure to zero. The blood to brain transfer of urea, sodium, and sucrose was then measured in sham control piglets and at 30 min and 2 hr of reperfusion following ischemia. At 30 min of reperfusion, urea and sodium transfer were increased while sucrose transfer was unchanged. However, at 2 hr of reperfusion, transfer of all three tracers was elevated. The difference in the time course of increased transport of these substances into the brain following ischemia cannot be explained by size differences, indicating that changes in the blood-brain barrier following ischemia are more complex than merely opening junctions between cells and creating leaky sites. Alterations in blood-brain barrier transport could participate in altered neuronal function after ischemia-reperfusion injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-272
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
Volume197
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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Reperfusion Injury
Brain Ischemia
Reperfusion
Sucrose
Urea
Brain
Blood
Sodium
Blood-Brain Barrier
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Arterial Pressure
Ischemia
Intercellular Junctions
Blood pressure
Intracranial Pressure
Animals
Animal Models
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Blood to Brain Transport after Newborn Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury. / Mirro, Robert; Armstead, William M.; Busija, David W.; Leffler, Charles.

In: Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, Vol. 197, No. 3, 01.01.1991, p. 268-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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