BMI and related risk factors among U.S. Marshallese with diabetes and their families

Monica L. Wang, Pearl A. McElfish, Christopher R. Long, Morgan S. Lee, Zoran Bursac, Andrea T. Kozak, Linda K. Ko, Noel Kulik, Karen Hye cheon Kim Yeary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Examine cross-sectional associations between body mass index (BMI) and related health behaviors, barriers and facilitators to health care, and perceived health status among a sample of U.S. Marshallese adults with Type 2 diabetes and evaluate associations of interest between participants and their family members. Design: Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from participants in a diabetes self-management education intervention trial. Setting: Data collection took place in home or community settings through a community-academic partnership in Arkansas. Participants: Study participants consisted of U.S. Marshallese adults with Type 2 diabetes (N = 221) and their family members (N = 211) recruited through community settings. Intervention(s): N/A. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants’ height and weight were measured using standard protocols to calculate BMI (kg/m2). Diet, physical activity, health care access, financial strain related to health care, perceived health status, and health care satisfaction were measured using self-report surveys. Results: Participants’ mean BMI was 31.0 (95% CI: 30.2–31.7), with over half of study participants and their family members’ BMI falling in the obese category. Participants’ BMI was positively associated with spreading health care bill payments over time (β = 1.75 (SE = 0.87); p = 0.045). Positive associations between participants and their family members were observed for self-reported health status conditions, health care coverage, health care utilization, and health care satisfaction. Conclusion: Study findings highlight the high prevalence of obesity and related risk factors among U.S. Marshallese adults with Type 2 diabetes and emphasize the need for intervention strategies that build upon cultural strengths and target community, policy, systems, and environmental changes to address obesity and chronic disease in this marginalized community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEthnicity and Health
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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chronic illness
Body Mass Index
Delivery of Health Care
health care
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
family member
Health Status
health status
community
Obesity
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Environmental Policy
Health Behavior
financial strain
Self Care
Healthcare
Risk Factors
Diabetes
Self Report
intervention strategy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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BMI and related risk factors among U.S. Marshallese with diabetes and their families. / Wang, Monica L.; McElfish, Pearl A.; Long, Christopher R.; Lee, Morgan S.; Bursac, Zoran; Kozak, Andrea T.; Ko, Linda K.; Kulik, Noel; Kim Yeary, Karen Hye cheon.

In: Ethnicity and Health, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Monica L. ; McElfish, Pearl A. ; Long, Christopher R. ; Lee, Morgan S. ; Bursac, Zoran ; Kozak, Andrea T. ; Ko, Linda K. ; Kulik, Noel ; Kim Yeary, Karen Hye cheon. / BMI and related risk factors among U.S. Marshallese with diabetes and their families. In: Ethnicity and Health. 2019.
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abstract = "Objective: Examine cross-sectional associations between body mass index (BMI) and related health behaviors, barriers and facilitators to health care, and perceived health status among a sample of U.S. Marshallese adults with Type 2 diabetes and evaluate associations of interest between participants and their family members. Design: Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from participants in a diabetes self-management education intervention trial. Setting: Data collection took place in home or community settings through a community-academic partnership in Arkansas. Participants: Study participants consisted of U.S. Marshallese adults with Type 2 diabetes (N = 221) and their family members (N = 211) recruited through community settings. Intervention(s): N/A. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants’ height and weight were measured using standard protocols to calculate BMI (kg/m2). Diet, physical activity, health care access, financial strain related to health care, perceived health status, and health care satisfaction were measured using self-report surveys. Results: Participants’ mean BMI was 31.0 (95{\%} CI: 30.2–31.7), with over half of study participants and their family members’ BMI falling in the obese category. Participants’ BMI was positively associated with spreading health care bill payments over time (β = 1.75 (SE = 0.87); p = 0.045). Positive associations between participants and their family members were observed for self-reported health status conditions, health care coverage, health care utilization, and health care satisfaction. Conclusion: Study findings highlight the high prevalence of obesity and related risk factors among U.S. Marshallese adults with Type 2 diabetes and emphasize the need for intervention strategies that build upon cultural strengths and target community, policy, systems, and environmental changes to address obesity and chronic disease in this marginalized community.",
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