Bone mineral density in triathletes over a competitive season

Barbara S. McClanahan, Kenneth D. Ward, Chris Vukadinovich, Robert Klesges, Linda Chitwood, Stephen J. Kinzey, Stan Brown, Dennis Frate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is evidence from previous cross-sectional studies that high volumes of certain sports, including running, swimming and cycling, may have a negative impact on bone mineral density. The aim of the present study was to evaluate prospectively the effects of high athletic training in individuals who engage in high volumes of all three of these activities (triathletes). Bone mineral density for the total body, arms and legs was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 21 competitive triathletes (9 men, 12 women) at the beginning of the training season and 24 weeks later. Age, body mass index, calcium intake and training volume were also recorded to examine potential mediators of bone mineral density change. Men had greater bone mineral density at all sites than women. No significant changes were observed over the 24 weeks for either total body or leg bone mineral density. Bone mineral density in both arms increased by approximately 2% in men (P < 0.03), but no change was observed for women. Change in bone mineral density at all sites was unrelated to age, body mass index, calcium intake and training volume. The results suggest that adverse changes in bone mineral density do not occur over the course of 6 months of training in competitive triathletes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-469
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Bone Density
Sports
Body Mass Index
Arm
Leg Bones
Calcium
Photon Absorptiometry
Running
Leg
Cross-Sectional Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

McClanahan, B. S., Ward, K. D., Vukadinovich, C., Klesges, R., Chitwood, L., Kinzey, S. J., ... Frate, D. (2002). Bone mineral density in triathletes over a competitive season. Journal of Sports Sciences, 20(6), 463-469. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640410252925134

Bone mineral density in triathletes over a competitive season. / McClanahan, Barbara S.; Ward, Kenneth D.; Vukadinovich, Chris; Klesges, Robert; Chitwood, Linda; Kinzey, Stephen J.; Brown, Stan; Frate, Dennis.

In: Journal of Sports Sciences, Vol. 20, No. 6, 01.01.2002, p. 463-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McClanahan, BS, Ward, KD, Vukadinovich, C, Klesges, R, Chitwood, L, Kinzey, SJ, Brown, S & Frate, D 2002, 'Bone mineral density in triathletes over a competitive season', Journal of Sports Sciences, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 463-469. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640410252925134
McClanahan BS, Ward KD, Vukadinovich C, Klesges R, Chitwood L, Kinzey SJ et al. Bone mineral density in triathletes over a competitive season. Journal of Sports Sciences. 2002 Jan 1;20(6):463-469. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640410252925134
McClanahan, Barbara S. ; Ward, Kenneth D. ; Vukadinovich, Chris ; Klesges, Robert ; Chitwood, Linda ; Kinzey, Stephen J. ; Brown, Stan ; Frate, Dennis. / Bone mineral density in triathletes over a competitive season. In: Journal of Sports Sciences. 2002 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 463-469.
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