Brain activation profiles during kinesthetic and visual imagery

An fMRI study

Marina Kilintari, Shalini Narayana, Abbas Babajani-Feremi, Roozbeh Rezaie, Andrew Papanicolaou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to identify brain regions involved in motor imagery and differentiate two alternative strategies in its implementation: imagining a motor act using kinesthetic or visual imagery. Fourteen adults were precisely instructed and trained on how to imagine themselves or others perform a movement sequence, with the aim of promoting kinesthetic and visual imagery, respectively, in the context of an fMRI experiment using block design. We found that neither modality of motor imagery elicits activation of the primary motor cortex and that each of the two modalities involves activation of the premotor area which is also activated during action execution and action observation conditions, as well as of the supplementary motor area. Interestingly, the visual and the posterior cingulate cortices show reduced BOLD signal during both imagery conditions. Our results indicate that the networks of regions activated in kinesthetic and visual imagery of motor sequences show a substantial, while not complete overlap, and that the two forms of motor imagery lead to a differential suppression of visual areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-261
Number of pages13
JournalBrain Research
Volume1646
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Motor Cortex
Gyrus Cinguli
Observation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Brain activation profiles during kinesthetic and visual imagery : An fMRI study. / Kilintari, Marina; Narayana, Shalini; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Papanicolaou, Andrew.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1646, 01.09.2016, p. 249-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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