Brain mechanisms for reading

The role of the superior temporal gyrus in word and pseudoword naming

Panagiotis G. Simos, Joshua I. Breier, James Wheless, William W. Maggio, Jack M. Fletcher, Eduardo M. Castillo, Andrew Papanicolaou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test the neurological validity of a dual-route model of reading by asking patients, who were undergoing electrocortical stimulation mapping, to read words with irregular print-to-sound correspondences and pseudo-words. Brain activation profiles were also obtained from these patients during an auditory and a visual word recognition task using whole-head magnetic source imaging. We demonstrated that reading is subserved by at least two brain mechanisms that are anatomically dissociable. One mechanism subserves assembled phonology and depends on the activity of the posterior part of the left superior temporal gyrus (STGp), whereas the second is responsible for addressed phonology and does not necessarily involve this region. The contribution of STGp to reading appears to be based on its specialization for phonological analysis operations, involved in the processing of both spoken and written language. (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2443-2447
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroReport
Volume11
Issue number11
StatePublished - Aug 3 2000

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Temporal Lobe
Reading
Brain
Language
Head

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Simos, P. G., Breier, J. I., Wheless, J., Maggio, W. W., Fletcher, J. M., Castillo, E. M., & Papanicolaou, A. (2000). Brain mechanisms for reading: The role of the superior temporal gyrus in word and pseudoword naming. NeuroReport, 11(11), 2443-2447.

Brain mechanisms for reading : The role of the superior temporal gyrus in word and pseudoword naming. / Simos, Panagiotis G.; Breier, Joshua I.; Wheless, James; Maggio, William W.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Castillo, Eduardo M.; Papanicolaou, Andrew.

In: NeuroReport, Vol. 11, No. 11, 03.08.2000, p. 2443-2447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simos, PG, Breier, JI, Wheless, J, Maggio, WW, Fletcher, JM, Castillo, EM & Papanicolaou, A 2000, 'Brain mechanisms for reading: The role of the superior temporal gyrus in word and pseudoword naming', NeuroReport, vol. 11, no. 11, pp. 2443-2447.
Simos PG, Breier JI, Wheless J, Maggio WW, Fletcher JM, Castillo EM et al. Brain mechanisms for reading: The role of the superior temporal gyrus in word and pseudoword naming. NeuroReport. 2000 Aug 3;11(11):2443-2447.
Simos, Panagiotis G. ; Breier, Joshua I. ; Wheless, James ; Maggio, William W. ; Fletcher, Jack M. ; Castillo, Eduardo M. ; Papanicolaou, Andrew. / Brain mechanisms for reading : The role of the superior temporal gyrus in word and pseudoword naming. In: NeuroReport. 2000 ; Vol. 11, No. 11. pp. 2443-2447.
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