Brainstem genesis of reserpine-induced ponto-geniculo-occipital waves

An electrophysiological and morphological investigation

D. Paré, R. Curró Dossi, Subimal Datta, M. Steriade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several experimental results indicate that the peribrachial (PB) cholinergic area of the pedunculopontine nucleus is the final relay for the transfer of brainstem-generated pontogeniculo-occipital (PGO) waves to the thalamus. However, the mechanisms underlying the PGO-related activity of PB neurons remain unknown. In order to study these mechanisms, single unit recordings in the PB area were performed in reserpinized cats. Because PGO waves are closely related to rapid eye movements, our microelectrode explorations were also aimed to some structures of the preoculomotor network, namely, the superior colliculus (SC) and parts of the central tegmental field (FTC). We have found several classes of PGO-on cells in the PB area, most of them descharging 80 ms or less before the peak of PGO waves. These cell-classes comprised high-frequency bursting cells, slow-frequency bursting cells, and neurons discharging single spikes or doublets. Intracellular recordings showed that PGO-on single spikes arise from conventional excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Among PGO-related cells in structures outside the PB limits, it was found that most SC cells discharge during or after the PGO, whereas FTC cells increase their discharge rate several hundreds of ms before PGO waves, thus indicating that PGO waves are elaborated long before the activition of PB neurons. Massive retrograde labeling was found in FTC following horseradish peroxidase injections into the PB area. We suggest that long-lead FTC neurons provide an excitatory input to PGO-on PB neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-544
Number of pages12
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume81
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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Reserpine
Brain Stem
Neurons
Superior Colliculi
Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials
REM Sleep
Microelectrodes
Horseradish Peroxidase
Thalamus
Cholinergic Agents
Cats
Injections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Brainstem genesis of reserpine-induced ponto-geniculo-occipital waves : An electrophysiological and morphological investigation. / Paré, D.; Dossi, R. Curró; Datta, Subimal; Steriade, M.

In: Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 81, No. 3, 01.01.1990, p. 533-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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