Brassica-gene interactions and cancer risk

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Not all vegetables are created equal, at least in regard to cancer prevention. Vegetables in the class Brassicaceous, genus Brassica, include broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. Table 12.1 contains a more complete list of Brassica vegetables. According to several recent reviews, the protective association between Brassica vegetable consumption and cancer risk is one of the most consistent in the nutritional epidemiological literature. In humans, these vegetables are the dominant, if not the only, source of glucosinolates, a family of nonnutrient phytochemicals. Once ingested, glucosinolates induce several critical metabolic enzyme systems responsible for carcinogen metabolism and excretion. Many of the genes encoding these enzymes are reported to have functionally significant variations in their nucleotide sequence. Thus, genetic markers of metabolic function may provide important clues to the mechanisms relating Brassica to cancer risk and guide the identification of those persons who might benefit the most from Brassica intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNutrient-Gene Interactions in Cancer
PublisherCRC Press
Pages237-268
Number of pages32
ISBN (Electronic)9781420004847
ISBN (Print)084933229X, 9780849332296
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neoplasm Genes
Brassica
Vegetables
Glucosinolates
Neoplasms
Phytochemicals
Enzymes
Genetic Markers
Carcinogens
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Fowke, J. (2006). Brassica-gene interactions and cancer risk. In Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Cancer (pp. 237-268). CRC Press.

Brassica-gene interactions and cancer risk. / Fowke, Jay.

Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Cancer. CRC Press, 2006. p. 237-268.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Fowke, J 2006, Brassica-gene interactions and cancer risk. in Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Cancer. CRC Press, pp. 237-268.
Fowke J. Brassica-gene interactions and cancer risk. In Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Cancer. CRC Press. 2006. p. 237-268
Fowke, Jay. / Brassica-gene interactions and cancer risk. Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Cancer. CRC Press, 2006. pp. 237-268
@inbook{9feec8bbf57c46b6a4e12a58ecbb1a2c,
title = "Brassica-gene interactions and cancer risk",
abstract = "Not all vegetables are created equal, at least in regard to cancer prevention. Vegetables in the class Brassicaceous, genus Brassica, include broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. Table 12.1 contains a more complete list of Brassica vegetables. According to several recent reviews, the protective association between Brassica vegetable consumption and cancer risk is one of the most consistent in the nutritional epidemiological literature. In humans, these vegetables are the dominant, if not the only, source of glucosinolates, a family of nonnutrient phytochemicals. Once ingested, glucosinolates induce several critical metabolic enzyme systems responsible for carcinogen metabolism and excretion. Many of the genes encoding these enzymes are reported to have functionally significant variations in their nucleotide sequence. Thus, genetic markers of metabolic function may provide important clues to the mechanisms relating Brassica to cancer risk and guide the identification of those persons who might benefit the most from Brassica intake.",
author = "Jay Fowke",
year = "2006",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "084933229X",
pages = "237--268",
booktitle = "Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Cancer",
publisher = "CRC Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Brassica-gene interactions and cancer risk

AU - Fowke, Jay

PY - 2006/1/1

Y1 - 2006/1/1

N2 - Not all vegetables are created equal, at least in regard to cancer prevention. Vegetables in the class Brassicaceous, genus Brassica, include broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. Table 12.1 contains a more complete list of Brassica vegetables. According to several recent reviews, the protective association between Brassica vegetable consumption and cancer risk is one of the most consistent in the nutritional epidemiological literature. In humans, these vegetables are the dominant, if not the only, source of glucosinolates, a family of nonnutrient phytochemicals. Once ingested, glucosinolates induce several critical metabolic enzyme systems responsible for carcinogen metabolism and excretion. Many of the genes encoding these enzymes are reported to have functionally significant variations in their nucleotide sequence. Thus, genetic markers of metabolic function may provide important clues to the mechanisms relating Brassica to cancer risk and guide the identification of those persons who might benefit the most from Brassica intake.

AB - Not all vegetables are created equal, at least in regard to cancer prevention. Vegetables in the class Brassicaceous, genus Brassica, include broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. Table 12.1 contains a more complete list of Brassica vegetables. According to several recent reviews, the protective association between Brassica vegetable consumption and cancer risk is one of the most consistent in the nutritional epidemiological literature. In humans, these vegetables are the dominant, if not the only, source of glucosinolates, a family of nonnutrient phytochemicals. Once ingested, glucosinolates induce several critical metabolic enzyme systems responsible for carcinogen metabolism and excretion. Many of the genes encoding these enzymes are reported to have functionally significant variations in their nucleotide sequence. Thus, genetic markers of metabolic function may provide important clues to the mechanisms relating Brassica to cancer risk and guide the identification of those persons who might benefit the most from Brassica intake.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056967242&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056967242&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85056967242

SN - 084933229X

SN - 9780849332296

SP - 237

EP - 268

BT - Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Cancer

PB - CRC Press

ER -