Breast and cervical cancer screening among Latinas attending culturally specific educational programs.

Lina Jandorf, Zoran Bursac, Leavonne Pulley, Michelle Trevino, Anabella Castillo, Deborah O. Erwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Latinas in the United States have higher morbidity and mortality rates for breast and cervical cancers (compared with non-Latina Whites), often due to lower screening rates. A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach could help to improve screening rates by creating a culturally customized educational program for Latino men and women addressing low knowledge, gender roles, and spirituality. OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a culturally customized program (Esperanza y Vida [Hope and Life]) in increasing breast and cervical cancer screening among Latinas, and to examine how screening rates related to changes in cancer knowledge, differences in ethnic origins, and geographic location. METHODS: Participants were recruited to attend either a breast and cervical (intervention) or diabetes (control) education program, within a randomized plan. Sixty-nine programs (44 intervention; 25 control) were conducted in Arkansas (AR; n = 39) and New York City (NYC; n = 30) with a total of 847 Latino men and women. Telephone follow-up data were collected on 49% of the women who consented to being contacted 2 months postintervention. RESULTS: At the 2-month follow-up call, screening rates were significantly higher for the intervention versus the control group for clinical breast examination (CBE; 48% vs. 31%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-4.2), breast self-examination (45% vs. 27%; aOR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-5.0), and Pap testing (51% vs. 30%; aOR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.1-14.1), but not for mammography (67% vs. 58%; aOR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.1-3.6). The aORs accounted for the significant effects of study site (AR vs. NYC) and marital status. CONCLUSIONS: Esperanza y Vida has the potential to reduce health disparities in breast and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality rates through increasing cancer screening and thereby increasing early detection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-204
Number of pages10
JournalProgress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

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Early Detection of Cancer
Hispanic Americans
educational program
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
cancer
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Breast Neoplasms
confidence
Hope
Breast
morbidity
Community-Based Participatory Research
Breast Self-Examination
Morbidity
Geographic Locations
mortality
Spirituality
Mortality
Marital Status

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Breast and cervical cancer screening among Latinas attending culturally specific educational programs. / Jandorf, Lina; Bursac, Zoran; Pulley, Leavonne; Trevino, Michelle; Castillo, Anabella; Erwin, Deborah O.

In: Progress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action, Vol. 2, No. 3, 01.09.2008, p. 195-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jandorf, Lina ; Bursac, Zoran ; Pulley, Leavonne ; Trevino, Michelle ; Castillo, Anabella ; Erwin, Deborah O. / Breast and cervical cancer screening among Latinas attending culturally specific educational programs. In: Progress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action. 2008 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 195-204.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Latinas in the United States have higher morbidity and mortality rates for breast and cervical cancers (compared with non-Latina Whites), often due to lower screening rates. A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach could help to improve screening rates by creating a culturally customized educational program for Latino men and women addressing low knowledge, gender roles, and spirituality. OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a culturally customized program (Esperanza y Vida [Hope and Life]) in increasing breast and cervical cancer screening among Latinas, and to examine how screening rates related to changes in cancer knowledge, differences in ethnic origins, and geographic location. METHODS: Participants were recruited to attend either a breast and cervical (intervention) or diabetes (control) education program, within a randomized plan. Sixty-nine programs (44 intervention; 25 control) were conducted in Arkansas (AR; n = 39) and New York City (NYC; n = 30) with a total of 847 Latino men and women. Telephone follow-up data were collected on 49{\%} of the women who consented to being contacted 2 months postintervention. RESULTS: At the 2-month follow-up call, screening rates were significantly higher for the intervention versus the control group for clinical breast examination (CBE; 48{\%} vs. 31{\%}; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.2; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.1-4.2), breast self-examination (45{\%} vs. 27{\%}; aOR, 2.3; 95{\%} CI, 1.1-5.0), and Pap testing (51{\%} vs. 30{\%}; aOR, 3.9; 95{\%} CI, 1.1-14.1), but not for mammography (67{\%} vs. 58{\%}; aOR, 0.7; 95{\%} CI, 0.1-3.6). The aORs accounted for the significant effects of study site (AR vs. NYC) and marital status. CONCLUSIONS: Esperanza y Vida has the potential to reduce health disparities in breast and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality rates through increasing cancer screening and thereby increasing early detection.",
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AU - Castillo, Anabella

AU - Erwin, Deborah O.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Latinas in the United States have higher morbidity and mortality rates for breast and cervical cancers (compared with non-Latina Whites), often due to lower screening rates. A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach could help to improve screening rates by creating a culturally customized educational program for Latino men and women addressing low knowledge, gender roles, and spirituality. OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a culturally customized program (Esperanza y Vida [Hope and Life]) in increasing breast and cervical cancer screening among Latinas, and to examine how screening rates related to changes in cancer knowledge, differences in ethnic origins, and geographic location. METHODS: Participants were recruited to attend either a breast and cervical (intervention) or diabetes (control) education program, within a randomized plan. Sixty-nine programs (44 intervention; 25 control) were conducted in Arkansas (AR; n = 39) and New York City (NYC; n = 30) with a total of 847 Latino men and women. Telephone follow-up data were collected on 49% of the women who consented to being contacted 2 months postintervention. RESULTS: At the 2-month follow-up call, screening rates were significantly higher for the intervention versus the control group for clinical breast examination (CBE; 48% vs. 31%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-4.2), breast self-examination (45% vs. 27%; aOR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-5.0), and Pap testing (51% vs. 30%; aOR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.1-14.1), but not for mammography (67% vs. 58%; aOR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.1-3.6). The aORs accounted for the significant effects of study site (AR vs. NYC) and marital status. CONCLUSIONS: Esperanza y Vida has the potential to reduce health disparities in breast and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality rates through increasing cancer screening and thereby increasing early detection.

AB - BACKGROUND: Latinas in the United States have higher morbidity and mortality rates for breast and cervical cancers (compared with non-Latina Whites), often due to lower screening rates. A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach could help to improve screening rates by creating a culturally customized educational program for Latino men and women addressing low knowledge, gender roles, and spirituality. OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a culturally customized program (Esperanza y Vida [Hope and Life]) in increasing breast and cervical cancer screening among Latinas, and to examine how screening rates related to changes in cancer knowledge, differences in ethnic origins, and geographic location. METHODS: Participants were recruited to attend either a breast and cervical (intervention) or diabetes (control) education program, within a randomized plan. Sixty-nine programs (44 intervention; 25 control) were conducted in Arkansas (AR; n = 39) and New York City (NYC; n = 30) with a total of 847 Latino men and women. Telephone follow-up data were collected on 49% of the women who consented to being contacted 2 months postintervention. RESULTS: At the 2-month follow-up call, screening rates were significantly higher for the intervention versus the control group for clinical breast examination (CBE; 48% vs. 31%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-4.2), breast self-examination (45% vs. 27%; aOR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-5.0), and Pap testing (51% vs. 30%; aOR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.1-14.1), but not for mammography (67% vs. 58%; aOR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.1-3.6). The aORs accounted for the significant effects of study site (AR vs. NYC) and marital status. CONCLUSIONS: Esperanza y Vida has the potential to reduce health disparities in breast and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality rates through increasing cancer screening and thereby increasing early detection.

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