Breast cancer risk among women who start smoking as teenagers

Inger T. Gram, Tonje Braaten, Paul Terry, Annie J. Sasco, Hans Olov Adami, Eiliv Lund, Elisabete Weiderpass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effect of smoking on breast cancer risk in a large population-based cohort of women, many of whom started smoking as teenagers. Methods: We followed 102,098 women, ages 30 to 50 years, completing a mailed questionnaire at recruitment to the Norwegian-Swedish Cohort Study in 1991/1992, through December 2000. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to estimate relative risk (RR) of breast cancer associated with different measures of smoking initiation, duration, and intensity adjusting for confounding variables. We conducted analyses on the entire study population, among women who had smoked for at least 20 years, among nondrinkers, and separately for each country. Results: Altogether, 1,240 women were diagnosed with incident, invasive breast cancer. Compared with never smokers, women who smoked for at least 20 years and who smoked 10 cigarettes or more daily had a RR of 1.34 (95% CI, 1.06-1.70). Likewise, those who initiated smoking prior to their first birth (1.27, 1.00-1.62), before menarche (1.39, 1.03-1.87), or before age 15 (1.48, 1.03-2.13) had an increased risk. In contrast, women who had smoked for at least 20 years, but started after their first birth, did not experience an increased breast cancer risk. The increased RR associated with smoking was observed among nondrinkers of alcohol, women with and without a family history of breast cancer, premenopausal and postmenopausal women, and in both countries. Conclusion: Our results support the notion that women smoking as teenagers and continue to smoke for at least 20 years may increase their breast cancer risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-66
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume14
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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Smoking
Breast Neoplasms
Birth Order
Menarche
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Proportional Hazards Models
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Population
Cohort Studies
Alcohols

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Gram, I. T., Braaten, T., Terry, P., Sasco, A. J., Adami, H. O., Lund, E., & Weiderpass, E. (2005). Breast cancer risk among women who start smoking as teenagers. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 14(1), 61-66.

Breast cancer risk among women who start smoking as teenagers. / Gram, Inger T.; Braaten, Tonje; Terry, Paul; Sasco, Annie J.; Adami, Hans Olov; Lund, Eiliv; Weiderpass, Elisabete.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 61-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gram, IT, Braaten, T, Terry, P, Sasco, AJ, Adami, HO, Lund, E & Weiderpass, E 2005, 'Breast cancer risk among women who start smoking as teenagers', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 61-66.
Gram IT, Braaten T, Terry P, Sasco AJ, Adami HO, Lund E et al. Breast cancer risk among women who start smoking as teenagers. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2005 Jan 1;14(1):61-66.
Gram, Inger T. ; Braaten, Tonje ; Terry, Paul ; Sasco, Annie J. ; Adami, Hans Olov ; Lund, Eiliv ; Weiderpass, Elisabete. / Breast cancer risk among women who start smoking as teenagers. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2005 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 61-66.
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