Breath ammonia depletion and its relevance to acidic aerosol exposure studies

Daphne Norwood, Thomas Wainman, Paul J. Lioy, Jed M. Waldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is thought that gaseous ammonia in breath neutralizes acidic air pollution and thereby potentially mitigates the pulmonary effects of pollution. The efficacy of breath ammonia depletion methods reported in recent acid aerosol exposuehealth response studies was investigated. Fourteen subjects (21 to 54 y of age) performed one or more of the following hygiene maneuvws: (a) acidic oral rinse (pH 2.5); (b) tooth brushing, followed by acidic oral rinse; (c) tooth brushing, followed by distilled water rinse; and (d) distilled water rinse. Initial ammonia levels ranged from 120 to 1 280 ppb (147-1 570 pg/m3). Acidic rinsing resulted in an immediate 90% reduction in exhaled ammonia in all subjects, and a return to 50% of baseline levels occurred within 1 h. Depletion that resulted from tooth brushing or distilled water alone was not significant. It was concluded that acidic oral rinsing is an effective method of reducing airway ammonia, but repeated oral rinsing may be required to maintain consistent, low-breath-ammonia conditions during acid aerosd exposure studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-313
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Environmental Health
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

Aerosols
Ammonia
ammonia
aerosol
tooth
Tooth
Water
Acids
acid
Air Pollution
hygiene
Hygiene
Air pollution
water
exposure
Pollution
atmospheric pollution
pollution
Lung
rinsing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Breath ammonia depletion and its relevance to acidic aerosol exposure studies. / Norwood, Daphne; Wainman, Thomas; Lioy, Paul J.; Waldman, Jed M.

In: Archives of Environmental Health, Vol. 47, No. 4, 01.01.1992, p. 309-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Norwood, Daphne ; Wainman, Thomas ; Lioy, Paul J. ; Waldman, Jed M. / Breath ammonia depletion and its relevance to acidic aerosol exposure studies. In: Archives of Environmental Health. 1992 ; Vol. 47, No. 4. pp. 309-313.
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