Brown's Syndrome in the absence of an intact superior oblique muscle

Roderick N. Hargrove, James Fleming, Natalie C. Kerr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brown's Syndrome was initially described as a superior oblique tendon sheath syndrome - a short anterior tendon resulting in a restricted elevation of the globe in the nasal field. Brown believed that a congenital paralysis of the inferior oblique muscle resulted in this secondary shortening of the anterior sheath of the superior oblique tendon.1 The definition of Brown's Syndrome has changed over time. It is currently defined as the inability to elevate the eye in the adducted position, both actively and passively on force duction testing, and can be acquired.2 The pathophysiology of acquired Brown's Syndrome may involve an abnormality of the superior oblique trochlea/tendon complex. However, it may also result from other causes unrelated to the superior oblique tendon or muscle, such as tumors of the superior nasal orbit, inferior orbital mechanical restriction, or an inferiorly displaced lateral rectus muscle and pulley.3,4 We present two cases in which a Brown's Syndrome was diagnosed after the superior oblique muscle had been disinserted or removed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)507-508
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of AAPOS
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004

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Oculomotor Muscles
Tendons
Nose
Muscles
Orbit
Paralysis
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Brown's Syndrome in the absence of an intact superior oblique muscle. / Hargrove, Roderick N.; Fleming, James; Kerr, Natalie C.

In: Journal of AAPOS, Vol. 8, No. 5, 01.10.2004, p. 507-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hargrove, Roderick N. ; Fleming, James ; Kerr, Natalie C. / Brown's Syndrome in the absence of an intact superior oblique muscle. In: Journal of AAPOS. 2004 ; Vol. 8, No. 5. pp. 507-508.
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