Caffeinated coffee and tea intake and its relationship to cigarette smoking

An analysis of the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II)

Robert Klesges, Jo Anne W. Ray, Lisa M. Klesges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that smokers' intake of caffeine is higher than non-smokers. This investigation evaluated the relationships between smoking status and self-reported caffeine intake from both coffee and tea. Subjects were adults who participated in the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). Results indicated that subjects who ingested caffeine from tea were more likely to be female, less educated, younger, non-Caucasian, and lighter drinkers. In contrast, those who ingested caffeine from coffee were more likely to be older, Caucasian, heavier drinkers, and have higher incomes. Smokers were not more likely to drink caffeinated tea. In contrast, smokers were much more likely to drink caffeinated coffee, and a dose-response relationship between caffeine from coffee and smoking intake was observed. These results clarify the relationship between smoking and caffeine intake. Implications for intervention efforts are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-418
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Nutrition Surveys
Coffee
Tea
Caffeine
Smoking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Caffeinated coffee and tea intake and its relationship to cigarette smoking : An analysis of the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). / Klesges, Robert; Ray, Jo Anne W.; Klesges, Lisa M.

In: Journal of Substance Abuse, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.01.1994, p. 407-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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