Calcifications associated with pediatric intracranial arterial aneurysms

Incidence and correlation with pathogenetic subtypes

K. O'Brien, J. Leach, B. Jones, John Bissler, M. Zuccarello, T. Abruzzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and purpose: Little is known about calcifications associated with pediatric intracranial arterial aneurysms (IAA). We sought to characterize calcifications associated with pediatric IAA according to aneurysm pathogenetic subtype. Materials and methods: Patients with IAA less than 20 years of age were retrospectively identified. Three fellowship-trained neuroradiologists independently reviewed each patient's CT studies for calcifications of the parent artery or aneurysm. Aneurysmal calcification (ANC) was correlated with characteristics of the patient (age, sex) and aneurysm pathogenetic subtype, size, morphology, rupture status, and location. Results: Thirty-three patients (mean age 10 years) with 43 IAA were analyzed. There were no parent artery calcifications. Nine IAA were calcified. IAA in children with non-hemodynamic risk factors (arteriopathy, trauma, infection, tumor) were more commonly calcified than idiopathic IAA (p = 0.029). More than one third of the pediatric IAAs in this group (arteriopathy, infection trauma, tumor) were calcified. IAA ≥ 10 mm were more likely to be calcified (p = 0.03). IAA that were ruptured at presentation were less likely to be calcified (p = 0.03). ANC was not significantly associated with patient age (≤10 years vs. >10 years), sex, morphology (fusiform vs. saccular) or location (anterior vs. posterior circulation). Conclusion: Aneurysmal but not parent artery calcifications are associated with a significant minority of pediatric IAA. Pediatric ANCs are associated with underlying non-hemodynamic vascular risk factors (arteriopathy, infection, trauma, and tumor), size ≥10 mm and non-hemorrhagic presentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)643-649
Number of pages7
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Intracranial Aneurysm
Pediatrics
Incidence
Aneurysm
Arteries
Wounds and Injuries
Infection
Neoplasms
Rupture

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Calcifications associated with pediatric intracranial arterial aneurysms : Incidence and correlation with pathogenetic subtypes. / O'Brien, K.; Leach, J.; Jones, B.; Bissler, John; Zuccarello, M.; Abruzzo, T.

In: Child's Nervous System, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.04.2013, p. 643-649.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Brien, K. ; Leach, J. ; Jones, B. ; Bissler, John ; Zuccarello, M. ; Abruzzo, T. / Calcifications associated with pediatric intracranial arterial aneurysms : Incidence and correlation with pathogenetic subtypes. In: Child's Nervous System. 2013 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 643-649.
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